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Author Topic: E.ON home battery system  (Read 1541 times)
dan_b
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« on: March 14, 2016, 02:10:20 PM »

http://cleantechnica.com/2016/03/14/e-on-launching-home-solar-storage-option-in-2-weeks/

Thoughts?
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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
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Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
Stochengberge
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« Reply #1 on: March 14, 2016, 04:28:12 PM »

The more in the marketplace, the more benefit for the consumer...

If it is good enough for the German market can one assume that it will work?

SB.
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On the North Downs of Kent with 3.2kWp facing 12' west of south @ 33', 36 x 58mm Thermal tubes on an east / west split, 300ltr triple coil DHWC and an 8kW to water WBS.
RIT
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2016, 07:27:40 PM »


The German market supports such devices because their per kWh electricity prices are so much higher (around 23p per kWh) and the state is providing support for anyone who purchases such a device.

I think currently we should be thankful that in the UK the current electricity do not make such solutions cost effective. It's also nice for the Germans to pay all the R&D costs for this tech so that in 5-10 years time we can purchase the low cost mass produced versions from China.
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2.4kW PV system, output can be seen at  - https://pvoutput.org/list.jsp?userid=49083

Why bother? - well, there is no planet B
dan_b
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« Reply #3 on: March 14, 2016, 07:49:09 PM »

Was kind of hoping for a discussion around whether a 4.4kWh battery would be deemed sufficient for a "soft grid" daily charge/ discharge application when the Tesla Powerwall is a 7kWh?  Also note they're selling it as an integrated package with a solar PV install st the same time for less than 6k. 
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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
RIT
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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2016, 08:29:23 PM »

Was kind of hoping for a discussion around whether a 4.4kWh battery would be deemed sufficient for a "soft grid" daily charge/ discharge application when the Tesla Powerwall is a 7kWh?  Also note they're selling it as an integrated package with a solar PV install st the same time for less than 6k.  

But the cost is the problem, even if you are optimistic about the amount of re-use you can see during sun light hours and then power you are able to time shift to night use you are going going to see a daily average of 4kWh for this device or 7kWh for a Tesla based system. With electricity in the UK currently available for 12p per kWh that means an income of 175 or 306 per year. This means you can never recover the cost of the installed system.

What makes the cost even more complicated is that currently with the cost of these systems falling every year it makes more sense to just sit back and wait. Why spend 6,000 this year to save 175, if next year the cost may only be 5,600 for the same system. You end up saving 225 (plus any interest you may receive on the funds) by doing nothing.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 08:41:54 PM by RIT » Logged

2.4kW PV system, output can be seen at  - https://pvoutput.org/list.jsp?userid=49083

Why bother? - well, there is no planet B
Stuart Ian Naylor
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« Reply #5 on: March 15, 2016, 04:22:13 AM »

The price of electricity in germany is almost twice what it is here, but still that isn't the important part.

Quote
The senior vice president of technology and innovation at E.ON, Susana Quintana-Plaza, commented: E.ON is committed to empowering customers and promoting decentralized energy solutions while expanding our power grids and making them smarter.

That is the important part and an extremely dangerous omission in the forward thinking of UK systems and grid.
We pay for an averaged tariff and are excluded from high cost energy, the Germans are going to open this up to a whole rake of decentralised products and solutions.

In the UK consumers are excluded from high returns on energy ( up to 2500 mWh wholesale) and technologies such as the above could be extremely viable practically anywhere.
The instant on grid load balancing they could provide at each branch of local substation could massively reduce the overall cost of electricity.
This could also massively increase grid resilience and renewable adoption capacity levels.

This is a hugely profitable area for anybody but the consumer.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2016, 04:26:53 AM by Stuart Ian Naylor » Logged
billi
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« Reply #6 on: March 15, 2016, 05:54:06 AM »

One can apply for a   grant in Germany for a battery  based PV  , there is no grant  there for  an EV   like in the UK  , nor is there a FiT payment for selfconsumtion
As far as i know one has to grant that max 50% of the peak  possible PV  can be feed into the public grid, to get that grant


Anyway , as u  know i  believe in other  methods ...

If  nuclear power is getting 92 per MWh   plus inflation increase  for a span of 35 years , then this should be offered to PV and battery as well 

So an easy one  for PV  and battery , as one can buy  a 10 kW PV with a Tesla store for  15000 installed


billi
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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
M
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« Reply #7 on: March 15, 2016, 06:51:50 AM »

Was kind of hoping for a discussion around whether a 4.4kWh battery would be deemed sufficient for a "soft grid" daily charge/ discharge application when the Tesla Powerwall is a 7kWh?  Also note they're selling it as an integrated package with a solar PV install st the same time for less than 6k. 

That would be a perfect size for me. When my import is higher, I don't have enough excess, and when my excess is really high in the summer, my import is only about 2.5kWh. The cross over point when I have higher import and sufficient export is about now, with daily import in Mch starting at around 5kWh and ending at about 4kWh as the month progresses, but total generation high enough to cover all demand (on average). So (for me) 7kWh would be too much.

Mart.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
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