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Author Topic: bees in a hole  (Read 1367 times)
djh
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« on: June 16, 2017, 05:53:53 PM »

We have some bees that appear to live in a hole in the ground. We noticed a small hole in the ground alongside a fig plant a few weeks ago with a bee occasionally coming out or going in. The bee looks like a bumble bee to my uneducated eye.

Then today I discovered a large hole next to the fig, exposing a bunch of its roots, and a number of bees in the hole and on the soil around the fig all looking busy doing something. The hole looks like it might have been dug by a fox or something of that size. But there's no sign of a spoil heap.

Is it an underground bumblebee nest? Do they exist and do they collapse?
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Cheers, Dave
stannn
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2017, 08:12:08 PM »

Yep, we usually find bumblebee nests underground when they are disturbed during weeding.

https://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/habitats/bumblebee-nests/
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2.45 kWp PV (Navitron supply), 40 evacuated tubes (Navitron supply), Clearview 650 log burner with back-boiler heating cottage and water, 2 off 50W border collies, 1 off 35W cat, 1 off 25W cat.
MR GUS
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2017, 09:42:04 PM »

Yes, they are great adopters, we have a good few bee species (exhibiting different traits, but not enough head count I'm seriously contemplating a hive set up but farmers will be annoyed as hell if I do (adjacent to fields)
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roys
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2017, 12:25:51 AM »

Surely the farmers would like bee hives next to their fields?
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djh
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2017, 12:34:16 AM »

From what little I read today I thought that only honeybees used a hive and that there is only one species of honeybee? The 24 species of bumblebees have much smaller nests with a few hundred individuals?
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todthedog
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2017, 08:20:26 AM »

The one problem of hives next to fields is what pesticides are in use.
Great fun to do.
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MR GUS
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2017, 08:30:46 AM »

Exactly, which means notice from farmer needed to close up hives, rather than spray willy-nilly  garden
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Austroflamm stove & lot's of Lowe alpine fleeces, A "finger" of Solar Sad
Noli Timere Messorem
Screw FITS ..it is, & always has been about the environment (said the penny-pinching Scotsman)
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