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Author Topic: splitting a double static caravan for moving - any ideas?  (Read 919 times)
marcus
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« on: August 29, 2017, 10:43:23 PM »

Hello all,

I managed to get Planning to replace my existing dwelling with a new house!  extrahappy

The new house is going on the same plot so the existing structure - a 35-40 yr old double static caravan with a built on conservatory - needs to move.

I can dismantle the conservatory, but I was thinking the quickest & tidy-est way of clearing the caravan off is to drag it off with the digger that's coming to dig the foundations, but as it's sitting on a built up plinth with a bit of a drop to the surrounding ground I'm guessing it'll be best moved in two halves rather than trying to drag it in one, but it's not clear how the two halves are attached to each other or how easily they will come apart.

Any advice / tips ideas?

The wheels are still on and are visually in good condition but as they're on the ground I can't tell if they'll turn - I suspect the digger will drag it anyway. I'm still living in it ATM so I'm holding off doing anything too destructive at least until I've got the touring caravan on site to sleep in.  Smiley

thx
M
PS it's not the end of the world if the static doesn't survive the move - as long as the site is clear for the builders - but it would be nice if it more-or-less survived as it would still be useful.
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regen
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2017, 06:11:35 AM »

Hi Marcus,

Why not try contacting one of the companies which built and then assemble these units on site. They should at least know how to split the units apart.

I wonder if they fit some sort of removable draw bar to get them in position. Can you jack up enough to see if the wheels at least still turn. If so it may be possible to move it slowly on scaffold boards or similar.

Regen
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« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2017, 06:36:16 AM »

Morning Marcus,

I know little of 'double wide' caravans but I've seen one on a couple of lorries and got the impression it was much more ridgid as a whole unit.

No idea really but if it were me I'd be leaving it whole.

Good luck, Paul
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todthedog
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2017, 07:46:01 AM »

This is how they are joined evidently. No actual knowledge.

https://www.hunker.com/13402398/how-to-join-two-single-wide-mobile-homes-into-a-doublewide

My instinct would be the same as Paul as bigger bits as possible.
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biff
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« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2017, 08:45:59 AM »

  2 piece mobile dwellings do suffer each time they are taken apart and put back together. That much i know Grin
    They are joined under neath with big bolts, These bolts are used to pull them tight together the last 25mm, They are joined the same way above the ceilings and joined at the ridge as well. I would say that taking them apart would be a much bigger job than putting them together because,when new, the bolts are fresh and easy managed the jacks are still strong and the timber floors etc still rigid.
 The ones that i saw errected came with temporarily 3 x 2 frame work which held the ceilings rigid and square during transport, 6" ply fillets run verticle each end to cover the verticle access to the bolts.
   So the whole mobile would have to be examined before any dismantling started, A comprehensive examination entailing the worth of it afterwards and the way it could be stored because they do not take kindly to being left exposed to the elements and degrade very quickly. You might find the remains of the detachable drawbar underneath. If you find a rotten chassis then it,s not worth the trouble.
I got to know these 2 piece mobiles in the early 90s or at a time when the Punt was doing well against the sterling, young married couples were buying them in the north and taking them across the border into Donegal. My job was to build the underpinning brickwork and finish up with a pair of matching Brick flower boxes on either side of the brick steps up to the front door Grin. You would be amazed how a  little brickwork could totally change appearances. I got very well paid for it but refused to do any more than 7 because it was doing my back in. You never got a chance to straighten up and get into overdrive, you were stooped all the time.
  A lot of the ones that I did had tiled roofs. The tiles were removed for transport but were quickly replaced on the site. I was told that normally they would have stayed on, apart from the ridges. The sections were 10ft by 38ft and came on a very high wagon that was able to turn the corners of our narrow roads with the tail of the mobiles clearing above the hedges, a skill on its own.
  I seriously doubt that a 35 to 40 years old static could survive being dismantled, so maybe your best bet it to , Free the wheels, lift all the jacks and supports, plank the two sets of wheels, Have a drawbar make up,(Not expensive) and pull it to a part of the site, where it is not in the road. Keeping it in one piece.. Then you can decide what to do with it. I have seen these pulled away in bits with a digger and you would not believe the mess that they make, there would be fiberglass blowing all over the shop for months afterwards and nobody needs that.
                                                       Biff
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biff
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« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2017, 09:00:34 AM »

An Idea Marcus,!!
  If you can save it, It will make and excellent shed on another part of the site.
                                                      Biff
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eabadger
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2017, 09:58:59 AM »

there is some odd american program on tv (wife refers to these things i stumble across as trash tv) where they buy big american trailer type static buildings and move them 100s of miles, some make it...........


steve
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« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2017, 11:23:44 AM »

We reinforced our two halves together with cross beams underneath to move it out of the way and live in it whilst building the new house. The wheels and axles were in tip top condition after 40 years or so! Tyres not so, but with a bit of jacking up, levelling of ground and some air, all went fantastically well. There are mobile home reclaimers out there, they might do it for nothing!
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marcus
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« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2017, 09:41:35 PM »

Hi Regen - I will try that - though I wonder if I'll find anyone with knowledge of statics of this era.

An Idea Marcus,!!
  If you can save it, It will make and excellent shed on another part of the site.                                                       Biff
That thought did cross my mind  Smiley but the only way I could move it to where I think you're right that it will be difficult to separate and more difficult to put back together - I just thought it's less likely to disintegrate if it's moved as two pieces; but having read everyones comments - particularly Dicksters - I'm now thinking some cross beams underneath - although I'm not sure I can get them in - there's concrete built up to near floor level on both sides. And there's still the drop off the pad to the natural ground level.

I actually found the original drawbars - they're holding up the roof of the lambing shed. They'd have to be welded back on as they appear to have been cut off so that cladding could be run down to the ground.

assuming I remove everything from inside before moving (including the parkray) how heavy are statics? would scaffolding planks work as ramps (I'm doubting it as they'd have to be fairly long)?
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gravyminer
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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2017, 10:13:55 PM »

Hey Marcus

well done on getting full planning for a dwelling !
They usually only allow 'caravan act' construction to be replaced by something that remains compliant with the act.

As for moving it/ them, my first thought was petrol stir but wiser heads seem to be prevailing.

In my experience they are extremely heavy in relation to the tiny wheels that attach to the axles for when they are being sited and if the ground is not incredibly firm, they will sink until the chassis is resting on the ground. Scaffold planks will split or tip if the ground is soft.

Depending on how much you value them, it might be possible to get a mobile crane to lift and swing using a couple of steels passed under the chassis with a suitable 'spreader beam' so the lift chains clear the shed roof ...

I recently moved a couple of dutch barns with a mobile crane,  they were 30ft x 20 ft with a calculated weight of just under 2 tonnes.
Used a 15 tonne crane. All went smoothly. 2 hours on site, 1 hour travel, 50 per hour.

Good luck !

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gravyminer
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« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2017, 02:13:32 PM »

Ooh thanks GM, always wondered the prices for craning something (i'm easily pleased)  extrahappy
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marcus
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« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2017, 10:19:36 PM »

Actually that crane is surprisingly cheap - the problem is access for a big crane and siting it on solid ground - I've been looking into access issues as I'm pricing up 3000 4" blocks, etc, and there's quite a price difference if they come on an artic vs a '6-wheel' lorry...

It's funny -  I used to think getting planning was the big hurdle - but now that that's done I'm finding this whole business of organising a house build is enough to drive a person insane.

As for getting planning GM; well it's been lived in for 35+yrs (I've been in it 5), council tax paid, and the previous owners built onto the caravan many years ago which i think means it was no longer technically a 'moveable structure'.

back on the subject of moving the caravan - sadly there's no practical way of getting it to where I could use a big low shed so I'll probably end up breaking it up anyway eventually, so the priority will be to get the site clear for digging the foundations.
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gravyminer
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« Reply #12 on: September 03, 2017, 10:37:52 PM »

Actually ridiculously cheap  whistlie

The local fabricator / farm building supplier was hugely helpful with this challenge ( think he enjoys the entertainment and doing 'something different' )
He called in his 'understanding' crane man who laughed when I showed him my carefully worked out lift plan, with weight, all dimensions  and radius required from the point at which the crane should be located.
Why you laugh sez puzzled me, I thought everyone had to have a lift plan nowadays that some poor sap would put their name ( and P.I. insurance ) to ?
Never had a lift plan sez he, thats why I'm here looking at the job before I commit to it  hysteria

Anyways he was happy with what he saw in terms of access, ground conditions and did take a copy of my little drawing. angel

The hourly rates were eerrr 'special' .......

But getting back to your challenge Marcus,

I really would encourage you to spend money now on a decent access and hard areas for material handling /storage / builder boys van parking, as winter is coming and unless you are very lucky the ground will fail to hold up once it turns wintry. You just cant have too much hard standing.
In the final analysis, the flow of materials to the workface is what makes a building project work .......

And a tracked 360 degree machine, capable of lifting 1 tonne packs, that lives on site ( ie your machine ) will be the most useful bit of kit you could buy.
Then after youve tidied up and landscaped, with access tracks, patios, ponds, rockeries, even slinkies buried 2m deep all over the place, you can sell the machine for pretty much what you paid for it  genuflect
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« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2017, 08:04:50 AM »



And a tracked 360 degree machine, capable of lifting 1 tonne packs, that lives on site ( ie your machine ) will be the most useful bit of kit you could buy.
Then after youve tidied up and landscaped, with access tracks, patios, ponds, rockeries, even slinkies buried 2m deep all over the place, you can sell the machine for pretty much what you paid for it  genuflect

I'll second, third and fourth that  genuflect bit like a cordless drill, tie wraps, ratchet straps, mobile phone and duct tape, once you have a digger you will wonder how you got through life without one.
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« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2017, 09:04:07 AM »



And a tracked 360 degree machine, capable of lifting 1 tonne packs, that lives on site ( ie your machine ) will be the most useful bit of kit you could buy.
Then after youve tidied up and landscaped, with access tracks, patios, ponds, rockeries, even slinkies buried 2m deep all over the place, you can sell the machine for pretty much what you paid for it  genuflect

I'll second, third and fourth that  genuflect bit like a cordless drill, tie wraps, ratchet straps, mobile phone and duct tape, once you have a digger you will wonder how you got through life without one.

To add to that list one of the most useful machines I have bought, even more used than my digger, is a tracked power barrow. Carries 1/4 ton and seems to climb walls. We have a very sloping site so even bringing logs up in a barrow is a pain.
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