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Author Topic: Orkney EMEC generates hydrogen from tidal machines.  (Read 291 times)
stannn
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« on: September 13, 2017, 04:56:55 PM »

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-scotland-business-41257407
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dan_b
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« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2017, 05:29:54 PM »

This was what was covered in FullyCharged the other week I think?

I know they have an excess of renewables on Orkney and transport fuel is their main fossil fuel burn, so I can see why they are looking at alternatives to burning bunker oil in their ships etc, but how long before the hydrogen all evaporates? Wouldn't it make more sense to make synthetic methane?  Or battery-convert the shipping fleets?
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« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2017, 05:47:00 PM »

Hydrogen is not suitable for storing regular generation from  tidal generation because about 50% of the energy is lost in the process.    Also tidal generation is quite expensive at present compared to wind generation especially in a windy area like the Orkneys.   Battery cars  also make sense  on Islands where journeys are all short and transporting fuel is difficult. 

https://gcep.stanford.edu/news/hydrogenorbatteries.html
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2017, 08:37:04 AM »

It makes not a jot of difference as to where the leccy was generated.  Electrolysis of water does not depend on the source of the electricity!

So poppycock journalism again.  For the unknowing, they let the cat out of the bag towards the end when they say the same electrolyser is also being powered by a wind turbine.

Electricity, once generated, has to be used somewhere.  It is all the same once on the grid.  The only difference is how much the source is subsidised and how much it is sold for (think here, the grid buys in as cheaply as possible, so once the buying price drops below the fuel cost - for fossil burners- they are generating at a loss!
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Warble
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« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2017, 09:57:17 AM »

Surplus electricity doesn't need to go on the grid. The demand for it may be intermittent and there are transmission losses if the source is remote from the demand so it makes sense to find a means of storing some of it locally.
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skyewright
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« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2017, 09:44:16 AM »

Surplus electricity doesn't need to go on the grid. The demand for it may be intermittent and there are transmission losses if the source is remote from the demand so it makes sense to find a means of storing some of it locally.
This week's Costing The Earth on BBC R4 was looking at that sort of thing in Cornwall...
Quote
New developments in battery technology are changing the way we power Britain. More efficient, higher capacity batteries expand the range of electric vehicles and allow solar and wind power plants to provide smooth, 24 hour electricity.

Tom Heap is in Cornwall where power companies and local innovators are developing a new battery-powered economic model that could be rolled out to the rest of the UK.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0938p7z
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David
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