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Author Topic: How safe is hinkley point?  (Read 403 times)
oliver90owner
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« on: October 12, 2017, 05:32:25 PM »

In view of the current warning re the possible tsunami if La Palma goes up in a big eruption?

In the news today after 40 tremors in two days

La Palma super volcano could erupt and tsunami may engulf BritainThe Canary island has been rocked by....

https://www.aol.co.uk/travel/2017/10/12/la-palma-super-volcano-erupt-tsunami-may-engulf-britain/?ncid=newsltuknew00000001AOL%20UK%20101217
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 05:37:57 PM by oliver90owner » Logged
Iain
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« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2017, 06:45:14 PM »

Hi
A more balanced outcome or conclusion?

http://www.lapalma-tsunami.com/tsunami.html

Iain
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desperate
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« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 07:24:47 PM »

Anyone would think it has been a slow news day? don't these numties have anything better to do than dredge up non-stories?

Desp
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biff
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« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2017, 09:08:02 PM »

All these Spanish names brought back memories,
                                               Mrs Biff and I went to Puerto Rico one year for a few weeks and while she sunned herself by the pool, i took off on a little ford fusion around the island. I was keen to see all their domestic wind turbines, These folks were light years ahead of the rest of the world and each factory on the outskirts of Las Palmas had it,s own big Turbine in it,s backyard. The Turbines themselves seemed not to be allowed in Puerto Rico but PR was absolutely covered in PV Grin.. I went to one of these big industrial estates and was absolutely gobsmacked they way that they planted them in their backyards. These would be big 50kw ones or more and all turbine working away in the breeze. I was told that the wind never stopped in that particular spot.
  I saw corrugated PV for the first time and never seen it since. We were up on the side of a cliff looking down on these chalets perched on the cliffs below and they had this corrugated PV on their roofs. I cannot imagine how difficult it would be to manufacture. I did think it might have been wet solar but a peek with the goggles proved otherwise. The Roads were good until you headed off to playa del Mogan and somehow it became damd hard work meeting those coached on the bends of the cliff faces. Imagine driving all that way on a nightmare road to speak to a cockney who served us fish and chips. No wonder he was laughing. We liked Puerto Rico and had a chalet by the harbour. It was all English folks who were running the resturants during the day and at night time, every nationality under the sun.
Water was a really serious problem, or the lack of it. They probably have a dozen large desalination plants by now.It was good.
                                                                                         Biff
  My apollogs  I never mentions the volcano and the lady with the roasted chickens but maybe the next time.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2017, 09:10:43 PM by biff » Logged

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RIT
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« Reply #4 on: October 13, 2017, 12:34:11 AM »

While I'm no fan of HPC, it should also be noted that they did a lot of redesign work after the Fukushima disaster. The main addition is that emergency water needed to panic cool the reactors will be held in a tank, rather than depending on operational pumps. Also the day to day cooling pumps have better protection (larger flood walls) and their size was increased.

So if we see a Hollywood grade tsunami from the Canary island in the next 60-70 years, the worse case is that HPC shuts down and may never restart at great cost to every taxpayer in the UK as we are the ones providing the insurance for such a situation.
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pdf27
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« Reply #5 on: October 13, 2017, 07:10:10 AM »

While I'm no fan of HPC, it should also be noted that they did a lot of redesign work after the Fukushima disaster. The main addition is that emergency water needed to panic cool the reactors will be held in a tank, rather than depending on operational pumps. Also the day to day cooling pumps have better protection (larger flood walls) and their size was increased.
I thought relying on gravity rather than pumps for emergency cooling was a major and original feature of both of the Gen III+ PWR designs. I can't find a source for it right now, but I remember reading that the idea was that there was sufficient water in backup tanks to flood the entire primary containment vessel via gravity several times over - i.e. enough to deal with boil-off from decay heat after a shutdown and keep liquid water present in primary containment.
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #6 on: October 13, 2017, 07:26:13 AM »

While there would be around three and a half hours warning, in the event of any unlikely catastrophic event in the volcanic locality, would the reactors be cooled to a safe level in the time frame expected?

I wonder if this was risk assessed when the site for the present reactors were approved.

There is evidence of marine sediments being located in surprising locations inland from the coast in the south west of our island, which may well mean a previous calamity did have some quite far reaching consequences.  

I remain neutral - neither pro or anti of conspiracy theories - but would not want swathes of the UK bathed in nuclear fall out from a nuclear reactor failure, along with the other devastating effects of such a potential tsunami reaching our southern coasts (or any others, for that matter!).

I do hope that the relevant authorities have their eyes and ears open to the threat, however remote, rather than just sticking their heads in the sand and waiting ... hoping it will go away.  Three and a half hours is not long to avoid making an already disaster for the coastal region, without contaminating half the rest of the country in the immediate aftermath.  Is it long enough?
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RIT
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« Reply #7 on: October 13, 2017, 11:49:14 AM »

While I'm no fan of HPC, it should also be noted that they did a lot of redesign work after the Fukushima disaster. The main addition is that emergency water needed to panic cool the reactors will be held in a tank, rather than depending on operational pumps. Also the day to day cooling pumps have better protection (larger flood walls) and their size was increased.
I thought relying on gravity rather than pumps for emergency cooling was a major and original feature of both of the Gen III+ PWR designs. I can't find a source for it right now, but I remember reading that the idea was that there was sufficient water in backup tanks to flood the entire primary containment vessel via gravity several times over - i.e. enough to deal with boil-off from decay heat after a shutdown and keep liquid water present in primary containment.

Well according to these reports additional design work was carried out after the Fukushima disaster.

     http ://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/energy/nuclearpower/10516997/Hinkley-Point-C-nuclear-power-plant-to-have-extra-flood-defences.html
     http ://www.burnham-on-sea.com/news/2013/hinkley-point-c-flood-surge-16-12-13.php
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Philip R
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« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2017, 11:04:42 PM »

PDF, The AP1000 reactors have the reserve water reservoir in the top of the reactor containment dome, hence the "close encounters of the 3rd kind" mound shape of the reactor buildings. Alas, not likely to see these any time soon in Cumbria, due to Toshiba Corperations financial woes.

Regarding HPC, before the public enquiry at Cannington college was afoot for the previous Hinkley C ( SZB Sister, cancelled in 1997) The HP staff car park was excavated so a geological survey could be undertaken. They looked at a fault line, and from the morphology, were able to ascertain data about its seismic activity. Work was also undertaken to ascertain the effects of sea level rise. I know, because I helped the consultants set up their meassuring/ monitorring equipment on the sea bed of the Bristol channel at the time. The effects of global warming on the sea level were very obvious back then.

The tidal range of the Severn estuary, second to the bay of Fundy in Canada, has posed challenges to the sea defences on that site already in the past. These were due to combinations of spring tides, westerly winds and low pressure "sucking up" the sea level. Flooding of the cooling water pump houses of both A and B stations in the 1970s, caused a site outage while the High voltage cooling water pumps motors gearboxes and electrical controls were were rebuilt. Additional protections to these structures were build and improved over the years.

HPC will have had all of this knowledge applied in the design stage.

Philip R
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« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2017, 11:50:24 AM »

as we know , all nuclear power stations on this planet  are an object and a wappon , simply for that reason , they have no place on this planet , beside their useless character in relation to energy supply
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