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Author Topic: Environment Agency: Harvesting rainwater for domestic uses guide  (Read 42740 times)
djh
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« Reply #30 on: August 09, 2010, 02:01:56 PM »

i understand that airated taps use a lot less water for similar effect if running tap to wash your hands but i could not find any when i redid our bathroom

There are lots available. I get lots of hits if I google for "tap aerator". They just screw on to the end of the tap.
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Cheers, Dave
Philip R
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« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2010, 09:34:39 PM »

I heard that each 1000l requires approx 0.9KWh to produce, pump and treat water with a consequent CO2 penalty. The less water used, the less wasteage of finite fossil fuel resources.

Here in the United Utilities service area, surface water drainage charges are based upon run off from roofs, curtilages ( driveway etc) and public highways, therefore, avoidance of the standing charge cannot be avoided, even if all the surface water from the property soaks into the ground. Therefore by attenuating heavy rainfall into the drainage system assists the water company sewerage plant operation by reducing peak throughput during rainstorms. By holding the water back, you assist the water company, adding some additional waste streams to this water increases their costs per litre. I would argue that it is still win win.

On the topic of reduced water content WC flushing and the move to reducing household water consumption is the problem of reduced flows down the foul drains is that they are more likely to block up with solid waste. Reducing WC flush volumes on modern WCs to 2.6/6liters will compound this. As an aside, the move to Air Admission Valves (AAVs) on mains drainage instead of the more familiar primary ventilated stack will allow a greater build up of combustible gases in the sewers, due to the higher content of slower moving solid waste.

The Environment Agency / Central Government are in conflict with local planning authorities: Sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDS) require water to soak into the ground, i.e using ditches, porous paving and various soakaway schemes. However, during redevelopment of existing property, many builders prefer to modify surface drainage and connect it to the foul drain instead. Planning permission and building control caveats should ensure SUDS is upheld, especially in high density areas like the southeast, where the water resources are depressed.

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clivejo
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« Reply #32 on: September 27, 2011, 11:01:28 PM »

I've got a meter attached to a cattle drinker.  Currently, it is switched off and uses zero cubic metres of water, but my bill is around 30 a quarter for a 'standing charge', what on earth is this charge for?
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Iain
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« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2011, 08:34:31 AM »

Hi Clivejo
That is because they have been trying to get everyone onto water meters and people are now trying to cut down on their usage and pay for what they use (less). Profits have dropped and the water companies are just trying to claw back some money.!!
I have had my rainwater system in for 5 years and have got my mains consumption down to 1 m3 /week, so now I am being economical and have a low bill they have just added a standing charge to bring it back up again. Perhaps I am being cynical but I doubt it.
Iain
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M
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« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2011, 09:07:19 AM »

There's nothing new about standing charges for water meters, they've always existed, but were recognised as being too low as they didn't truly reflect costs. I've been on a meter with Dwr Cymru for about 6 years, and consumption has steadily dropped from 80 units to about 50 per annum. Standing charge is about 100 pa.

The unit cost of water supplied and water removed should only reflect the cost of those units, the standing charge reflects the running costs of the infrastructure and admin etc. In DC's opinion each connection costs about 100 pa even if no water is consumed. Sounds about right to me, especially when you consider just how much pipe replacement, maintenance and new infrastructure has taken place since 1991.

If all costs were put onto the unit cost then low users would pay too little, high users too much, and a separate tariff would be needed for those that just re-fill a bowser at local depots.

Not trying to run an advert for Dwr Cymru, but credit where credits due, accounts cost companies money even if they don't get used.

Martyn
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
clivejo
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« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2011, 06:03:02 PM »

That is because they have been trying to get everyone onto water meters and people are now trying to cut down on their usage and pay for what they use (less). Profits have dropped and the water companies are just trying to claw back some money.!!

Yeah right.  This is Northern Ireland Water we are talking about!! Christmas past, thousands of customers lost supply due to the 'unprecedented' cold snap.  Was there compensation made to the customers who had their Christmas ruined, I dont think so!!  Yet they still managed to make a profit of 80 Million !!!  (Source : http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-15072378)  Huh

Apparently there are approx 720,000 households in NI, and that 'profit' works out about 111 per household.  How can they justify that ?!?!?  Its Ireland for pity sake, we are swimming in water!  banghead
« Last Edit: September 28, 2011, 06:08:35 PM by clivejo » Logged
JMALW
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« Reply #36 on: March 16, 2012, 11:08:51 PM »

This is a subject close to my heart - The first thing I did was get on a meter, the second thing was dig a hole to see if there was a water table not too deep - I found it 3 meters down in sandstone and it was always at that level winter and summer. The third thing was make the hole 2m in diameter. The fourth thing was buy some concrete rings - 3 off and they came on a lorry with a crane. The driver kindly lowered them into my hole. This gave me as near as does not matter 6000 lts. To make the thing water tight I Laid a concrete base and sealed the whole thing with two pack coating. Then bought four IBCs and fixed them onto scaffolding poles 1m high.  I had left a 600mm diameter hole with smaller concrete pipes down to the water table.  Then installed a submersible pump powered by a couple of solar PV panels pumping water up to the IBCs which then ran down to three tubs filled with silica sand to filter the water using the smuchdekka principle to achieve potable water quality crystal clear which we use for flushing toilets, washing clothes, cars, garden, green house and all for free after a total layout of 1000.  We just use the mains for drinking,bathing and cooking - about 35/quarter.  The upshot is we use about 10,000 lts per week for all the other stuff I mentioned. This was all done 6 years ago so I leave you to work out if it was worth it.  Oh I forgot - we have a high pressure submersible 4.5 bar pump equal to the mains pressure and volume which stops pumping when the taps are off and work from a battery bank with inverter if we use the toilet in the evening. There is a small downside - you do have to keep the filters clean about once every six months by back flushing. Before we started our bills were 500 annually on the rates and I think its now about 800. I'm very happy.
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Now where did I put that Flux Capacitor?
winny
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« Reply #37 on: March 23, 2012, 12:55:01 PM »

We use rainwater, and ocasionally well water for all of our water needs as we don't have mains water connected.

We were going to have a 6.5 thousand litre tank but the cost was prohibitive so I bought 7 IBCs, connected and buried them.  All of our rain gutters feed into a filter box to trap the large debris, then into another settlement tank to catch anything the first filter has let through, then distributed into the 7 tanks.

A pump sucks the water through a pair of filters that get rid of all the nasties and chlorine taste (I add clorine into the second settlement tank)  We have to be careful during long dry spells but as we intend building additions to the property we hope that the extra roof area will enable us to refill the tanks more effectively during the summer.

I used to be on the mains at our previous house and don't miss it!

Good luck to you all and I'd recommend getting imaginative!

Winny
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