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Author Topic: Production of Tesla solar roof tiles has started.  (Read 1092 times)
stannn
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« on: January 09, 2018, 09:14:18 PM »

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-tesla-solar/tesla-says-solar-roof-production-has-started-in-buffalo-idUSKBN1EY2B9
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chasfromnorfolk
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2018, 04:38:50 PM »

Well, how interesting: not bad looking and under the right circs economic too - assuming Iíve interpreted their quote correctly... ď solar roofs would cost between 10 & 15% less than an ordinary roof plus traditional panels.Ē

So, for a refurb (or new build) a slatey-looking roof producing electrickery for less than usual tiles+panels?

Is there anything not to like? Output per m2? Horrid glare? Has my usual boyish enthusiasm been once more cruelly misplaced?

Chas
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2018, 05:27:00 PM »

Chas,

As somebody with a Scotch slated property I thought the multi-hued appearance of the Tesla 'tiles' was a very positive feature. Unfortunately I can't make any justifiable use of them at this property even if I wanted to.

Regards

Richard
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2018, 05:30:17 PM »

Having family in the US and having visited for 40 years I have the impression that many/most roofs are of shingle construction. If this is correct, what effect would this have on the construction of roof bracing, Tesla panels vs shingles?
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2018, 08:08:29 PM »

I agree it seems like a superb solution for all new builds, and anyone needing a full roof re-do?  They look excellent aesthetically, and I assume output must be good not least because it's the whole roof area?
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A.L.
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2018, 10:08:16 PM »

hello,

I agree it seems like a superb solution for all new builds, and anyone needing a full roof re-do?  They look excellent aesthetically, and I assume output must be good not least because it's the whole roof area?

There are 'dummy' slates available so you can tailor your output. Sanyo/Panasonic HIT technology. Potentially very good but of course the price will be the determinant.
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JohnS
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2018, 11:11:24 PM »

Are they connected up in series or do they have micro inverters or optimisers?

In other words, how do they handle shading?
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« Reply #7 on: January 11, 2018, 07:15:28 AM »

I think for new-builds they make great sense, especially given their 'infinite' warranty (as long as the house lasts) due to the tiles/slates being extremely tough. Personally I don't mind the look of PV panels, or perhaps don't care, but I accept that these look nicer.

There was a recent article on the MSE site where a couple had bought a house with PV, and were asking how to get it removed as they don't like the look. Based on the install date, I advised them that FiT's, export and leccy savings would be nearly a grand a year for another 17 (or so) years. They didn't care, PV has to come down.
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TheFairway
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« Reply #8 on: January 11, 2018, 08:02:07 AM »

I paid a significant premium for more efficient therefor smaller area of panels and to me more aesthetically pleasing black panels so I can see that they are not to everyone's taste - my neighbours install is a right pigs ear but at least they are not typically overlooked.

But losing huge amounts of FIT takes that to a different level, especially as removing may reveal defects beneath - our tiles needed to be modified to get them to sit flat on the support legs so they may still end up with visual artifacts especially if you cannot source replacements quickly enough.

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pdf27
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2018, 08:40:45 AM »

Are they connected up in series or do they have micro inverters or optimisers?

In other words, how do they handle shading?
They're connected in series through to a single inverter. That's actually a show-stopper for me to use them - I'm currently looking at a new build in ~18 months time, but planning restrictions mean that the south-facing elevation would need to have a load of dormer windows. With micro-inverters these would be idea for the application (it would have south, east and west facing surfaces) but with conventional inverters they would be limited to a small strip across the top of the roof.
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JohnS
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2018, 12:36:12 PM »

Have you considered Velux type windows instead of dormers?

I find that dormers can often be small and pokey and not let in much light.  Veluxes let in more light and can have good headroom under them if carefully positioned.  Also by sloping the edges to the inside of the roof on the inside, more space and light can be achieved - similar to the slot windows in old castles.
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pdf27
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2018, 02:41:14 PM »

Have you considered Velux type windows instead of dormers?

I find that dormers can often be small and pokey and not let in much light.  Veluxes let in more light and can have good headroom under them if carefully positioned.  Also by sloping the edges to the inside of the roof on the inside, more space and light can be achieved - similar to the slot windows in old castles.
The local planning guidance explicitly encourages dormer windows, and we aren't too far away from not needing them (ridge height limit is ~30cm too low) so the internal impact should be quite limited - it's practicable to make them quite big. There is also the summer overheating issue - dormers are pretty well shaded from overhead sun, Velux windows are not. Given that this would be a Passivhaus-level new build, summer overheating is a significant issue.
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dimengineer
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2018, 08:43:50 PM »

I think for new-builds they make great sense, especially given their 'infinite' warranty (as long as the house lasts) due to the tiles/slates being extremely tough. Personally I don't mind the look of PV panels, or perhaps don't care, but I accept that these look nicer.

There was a recent article on the MSE site where a couple had bought a house with PV, and were asking how to get it removed as they don't like the look. Based on the install date, I advised them that FiT's, export and leccy savings would be nearly a grand a year for another 17 (or so) years. They didn't care, PV has to come down.

Wow. I find that just astonishing. Words fail me.  facepalm
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dimengineer
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« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2018, 08:45:59 PM »

Perhaps I should have added. What sort of people were they? I'm curious.
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TT
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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2018, 07:15:28 AM »

Personally I donít like the look of my solar panels, but I donít have to look at them

Not everyone is motivated by money, so if I was living in my period home, and redeveloping it PV wouldnít be a consideration
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