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Author Topic: tractors?  (Read 1685 times)
Greenbeast
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« Reply #30 on: September 29, 2018, 03:33:20 PM »

Ha ha good stories.

My old zetor is currently only equipped with a hand brake, which only operates on one wheel.
Has no lights and i've just stripped the wiring out after it almost caught fire due to a new alternator conversion on old wiring!!
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eabadger
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« Reply #31 on: September 29, 2018, 03:42:53 PM »

axxa didnt say, just private owned no reward type thing, i was surprised myself.
next is to register it, we have an odd system here, it has a fiscal horsepower which has no relation to actual hp.
then each county has a charge per fiscal hp, but anything over 10 years is 1/2 price, reason people keep stuff so long here is you only pay the tax when you first buy.
no age related plates, so will have a newer plate than any of our cars!

steve
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1kw wind turbine.
26kw wood stove back boiler to underfloor heating and dhw
biff
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« Reply #32 on: September 29, 2018, 05:25:49 PM »

As a Kid,
    I was always hearing stories of men being killed. I think way back then, there was this natural selection of the most savey conscious tractor men. If a man did not pay attention to his tractor and what was going on,,he paid for it by either being disabled or with his life. There was a plum of a death trap on the back of the DB Cropmaster, The PTO stuck out under the pulley,where you could not see it but where it could catch a wayward sleeve or trouser leg. the results were pretty gruesome. The belt pulley on the major was on the right hand front side but on the crop master it was on the rear between the bars above the pto. There was normally a cover on the PTO but with all the pushing and running around it was discarded. Hence our original BSM  big strong man, almost got killed this day in our rear yard ,at the old place. The PTO was engaged but even when it was not engaged, it still spun around, dragged with the oil in the diff. The pto lever was to the front of the axle on the right, approx 9" long sticking straight up, easy to reach, or so you would think, The tail of John coat got caught just as i stopped to have a look at what he was doing, I heard the ripping and then he started jumping about . It all happened so fast but I still have this clear recollection of John grabbing the rear of the two mudguards and pushing his legs back and bracing himself, Then I heard the ripping as the coat was torn from his back and he staggered away sideways, wearing just the sleeves with the coat gone in twisted ribbons. My Mother took him into the kitchen and got the vest of him, His back was a mess of blue red strips,all his muscles were pulled but he was OK other wise. He was lucky, some other tried to reach forward to push the lever off, Then they were too close to fight it when the lever refused to give because of the pull.They did not make it.
   A lot of the early majors were TVO and very easy started,,so easy that a lot of their owners never bothered putting new batteries in them because all it,s necessary 12 volt electricity could be fed from a magneto.
 Generally they were stored dry with their bonnets stuck into the dryest part of the shed, tight to a dry wall because it kept the ledckies dry,  So a neighbor rose at 7ish,,went out to start the major, with the handle while the wife made the breakfast. He would run the major on petrol for a few minutes,,sometimes 5 minutes in the frosty weather, before switching over to the TVO the breakfast was on the table and still he was outside and the tractor running,tires smoking with two hole dug, so out she went and found him pinned up against the wall by the front of the major,It started low gear and he did not get time to get clear,,.Then a good friend of my fathers worked the county with this threshing mill behind the Major, The mill was the type with the 5th wheel and the drums high above the triangular drawbar, He got into the field fine,,down from the road ,into a steep hollow and up the steep rise on the other side He thrashed the lot but returning down the hill to the road, the mill sped up and the front part crushed Dan to death on the seat of the Major.. That was very sad. One of the very best dogs we ever had was a gift from the very same man.,, I could go on and on. My old man and I had plenty of narrow squeaks but,,, but....enough,,tractors are slow, powerful  and very very handy,,,,,,,,,,but quite deadly even when you are following the rules.
                                 Biff
  I knew one hard working guy who worked the county spreading lime. He stopped at the head of the field to switch drive shafts from the spreader to the PTO (Big modern safety conscious tractor) ( big new ford) New drive shaft clipped into place and as he stepped over it,,it caught his trouser leg. He always worked on his own. It ripped his leg off. He tied the stump tight and crawled to the car and drove a good 35 mile at least to the hospital., He survived and got better and went back to spreading lime just like before. I simply cannot imagine the pain that that man felt and the determination that he had to stay alive. He "is" a good un.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 05:34:43 PM by biff » Logged

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djs63
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« Reply #33 on: September 29, 2018, 05:39:20 PM »

And be very, very careful driving across slopes. And if something is not right, walk away, think about it, get help if necessary and if possible.  The likely injuries are horrendous, if not fatal.
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biff
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« Reply #34 on: September 29, 2018, 09:52:18 PM »

I look back and read my previous post,
                         No doubt about it, I am a serious doom and gloom merchant, even if i do not intend it that way. There were lighter sides to life and some rare old laughs. The last tractor that i kept was a white 770,Selectamatic DB. It was a nice tame little thing with the 3 cylinder engine not unlike the Massey35 but the lift was dangerous. If you threw a concrete block into the link box the handle would dart into the up position and the link box would fly up to the top position. So I kept the lift controls locked with a round of elastic rubber tube. It did not have a lot of power but it was easy on diesel and pretty handy on the beach, absolutely reliable and easy started.
  Whole rural communities in Ireland and England were held together by these old tractors. They were symbols of wealth and acumen, of self made man and  "He ,s no fool".
Just this week in our local newspaper,there is the story of an local 80 year old farmer getting a fully restored 1954 DB Cropmaster for his birthday, There he is on the front page ,sitting up on the tractor which was driven into the hall where he was having his birthday party. He does not look too comfortable, Grin.
  I recall the results of the Ford Nan and the T20 going head to head over Ferguson,s 3 point linkage and hydraulics. With Henry losing the battle and getting stung for millions, making Harry richer.
There is even a T20 with an Italian built engine nothing like as good as the Ferguson one.. But all this sadly is lumped in beside the Stephenson,s Steam genius, way back when the world was young. It is all computers now, The only chips Stephenson and Ferguson had were scattered over the road to keep their boots from sticking to the tar. Computers are go. I wonder what Harry would think of it all.
                                                              Biff
 
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 10:13:09 AM by biff » Logged

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