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Author Topic: Toshiba pulls out of NuGen Moorside Nuke plant  (Read 285 times)
dan_b
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« on: November 08, 2018, 08:51:30 AM »

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-46122255

"After considering the additional costs entailed in continuing to operate NuGen, Toshiba recognises that the economically rational decision is to withdraw from the UK nuclear power plant construction project, and has resolved to take steps to wind-up NuGen"

Ouch
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Moxi
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« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2018, 01:35:44 PM »

Hardly surprising given that such large complex prime movers historically were specific realm of governments - I cannot comprehend why anyone would be surprised that big business is struggling to find financial backing for expensive hard to build projects like these when there are other proven cheaper technologies available with faster payback and surety of project delivery compared to "new" nuclear's recent track record around the world.

Don't get me wrong I have worked in the industry cleaning up the mess and such leviathans can be made to work and work well but never as a profit making enterprise.  They could have their place in the mix but the question is should they when there appears to be easier options such as tidal (again not in my opinion a project for the private sector but more of a nationalised base load / security measure).

 
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azps
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« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2018, 02:55:23 PM »

Hardly surprising given that such large complex prime movers historically were specific realm of governments - I cannot comprehend why anyone would be surprised that big business is struggling to find financial backing for expensive hard to build projects like these when there are other proven cheaper technologies available with faster payback and surety of project delivery compared to "new" nuclear's recent track record around the world.

Don't get me wrong I have worked in the industry cleaning up the mess and such leviathans can be made to work and work well but never as a profit making enterprise.  They could have their place in the mix but the question is should they when there appears to be easier options such as tidal (again not in my opinion a project for the private sector but more of a nationalised base load / security measure).

We should do tidal because we're going to need to build flood barriers on our economically-productive estuaries anyway, so may as well make them generate electricity anyway. The more difficult question is which areas do we protect, and which do we surrender to the sea? The new generation of UK climate predictions (UKCP18) will help inform those decisions, and that's due to be released round about now.

Regrettably, the word from the back-room is that countries are going into this year's UNFCCC COP with quite a lot of pessimism; and with Brazil, the USA and even this year's hosts - Poland - being run by climate deniers, things are looking tough.
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pdf27
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2018, 07:13:05 PM »

It's worth noting that Toshiba took huge losses when Westinghouse (which they owned) folded in the USA. That essentially meant that they have decided to get out of the nuclear business, and since talks with KEPCO to sell NuGen to them failed, Moorside was on borrowed time.
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« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 11:20:57 AM »


We should do tidal because we're going to need to build flood barriers on our economically-productive estuaries anyway, so may as well make them generate electricity anyway. The more difficult question is which areas do we protect, and which do we surrender to the sea? The new generation of UK climate predictions (UKCP18) will help inform those decisions, and that's due to be released round about now.


This is yet another benefit of all fluvial RE, that some of excess energy we've been adding to the atmosphere and oceans returns to us to be used again. Landscapes and seascapes may grow less attractive to some eyes, but it's a relatively small price to pay for clean, safe energy and better than any alternative.
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