navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Mars landing by InSight lander  (Read 325 times)
Wickham
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 380



« on: November 27, 2018, 11:28:13 AM »

Another great achievement.

I believe that Mars has frequent dust storms which would adversely affect a parachute and there is also the risk of landing on a rock. Even landing a few small stones would affect the stability and level of the craft. It could wobble in the wind. So was NASA lucky or were these risks avoided by clever design and operation?
Logged

14 Upsolar UP-M190M 190W panels total 2.66kWp and 13 Enecsys SMI-200/G83 and 1 SMI-240/G83 72 cell micro-inverters and website gateway unit, ground-mounted in early May 2011; 30 degree slope; 5 degrees east of south; 8 miles west of Salisbury
MeatyFool
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 150


« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2018, 03:35:45 PM »

I have done no research before this ...

I seem to recall that this method of arrival/landing had been used for one of the other landers some years ago.

The rockets that arrest downward travel just before landing fire after radar has got a lock on the terrain.

I would guess there is sufficient leeway in the fuel reserves to "dodge" anything that is of concern.

Meatyfool..
Logged
skyewright
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1760


« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2018, 09:55:31 AM »

Even landing a few small stones would affect the stability and level of the craft. It could wobble in the wind. So was NASA lucky or were these risks avoided by clever design and operation?
I recall hearing an interview (Inside Science R4?) in which someone mentioned that for this non-mobile project they had especially picked a particularly flat & featureless bit of the surface as good even contact with the ground was especially important given seismic study aspects of the mission.
Logged

Regards
David
3.91kWp PV  (17 x Moser Baer 230 and Aurora PVI-3.6-OUTD-S-UK), slope 40, WSW, Lat 57 9' (Isle of Skye)
stannn
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4746



« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2018, 01:10:06 PM »

https://www.verdict.co.uk/nasa-insight-lander-solar-power-record/
Logged

2.45 kWp PV (Navitron supply), 40 evacuated tubes (Navitron supply), Clearview 650 log burner with back-boiler heating cottage and water, 2 off 50W border collies, 1 off 35W cat, 1 off 25W cat.
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!