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Author Topic: Newbie - Our Project - Initial Idea  (Read 1195 times)
rogthedodge
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« Reply #30 on: December 07, 2018, 03:25:30 PM »

There is no external render to any elevation - just good old plain brick. We are not living in the house at present - renting c.15mins away.
Back to original pics..

above north-east elevation is twice width of southwest elevation below..if you get my drift?


so we have 2x north-east facing roofs and 2x south east facing roofs

what you cannot see is the GII listed hall which would have a view of some of the roof elevations.

Having chatted to the builder, as we're dealing pretty much with a bare shell, we'll strip back all walls. Shot below is the room with chimney showing in second shot above = 3x external walls which the damp meter showed as good, but not dry lined. Hempcrete rings a bell. Sand mixed with another ingredient ...a solution from many years ago


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rogthedodge
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« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2018, 03:50:27 PM »

I'm sure the eagle-eyed amongst will have spotted that our house is not at 90 degrees - should have read 2x north east facing roofs and 2x south west facing roofs facepalm

at the risk of hi-jacking my own thread. I've just worked out where Paul is......beautiful. Somewhere in the distance below

taken from atop Applecross Pass
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brackwell
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« Reply #32 on: December 07, 2018, 04:16:53 PM »

What are you doing with the fireplaces/chimneys.  These are probably the biggest source of heat loss in the house by allowing warm air to go up the chimney 24/7 .  Remove ,block up or fit a wood burning stove that can be shut off completely.
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kristen
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« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2018, 04:44:59 PM »

or fit a wood burning stove that can be shut off completely.

Just for info: my wood-burning stove has an external air supply (pipe).

There is no external render to any elevation - just good old plain brick

Just in case of any misunderstanding, I think the discussion was that IF you were to wrap it (externally) you'd lose the brickwork, which is probably a feature that you would prefer to keep?
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biff
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« Reply #34 on: December 07, 2018, 05:25:46 PM »

Yee better not dally,
                The tea and biscuits will all be gone. I can see that he is in a rush and trying to open the back door. The house is that dry and warm that the frame shrunk and the back door jammed.
   Of course he will tell you that there is no back door to the house.
  I recall another friend who only started drinking and backing horses when he was 54 years old. he did not marry and lived on his own. Between the booze and the horses he ran out of money and then the callers started knocking on his front door looking for the dosh that he owed them. F had no back door.  F,s answer was to put a chain and padlock on the front door and then climb in the window beside the front door. When people came to knock on the door looking for F and their money, they would see the chain and padlock and go away. By then he was riding a bike loaned to him by a nephew who wished to inherit his farm,,,,eventually but unknown to the nephew, F had managed to get an amazing overdraft on the place and by the time he passed away there was nothing left for the nephew but his own old black Raleigh pushbike.
 In truth, having no back door is the sign that the house is worthy of credit, Having a back door can mean that the inhabitants are ready for a quick exit or escape, out the back door and over the back gate and away over the fields. I have to confess that all my relatives including myself, have all got back doors, I even have a side door. I will have to reflect deeply on this but it is good to know that I can now lay the blame for all my financial misfortunes at the back door of our old house of many years ago.
  Modern education and hygiene meant that back doors came into vogue. It was only right that people should go out the back and do the business somewhere that did not offend the nose. There are no officials records of what they did before that. We can only guess that they held themselves under strict control for days on end.  Now we are back to square one and no back door, no fresh air and nobody going outside to do the business.These days they demand loads of fiber in the diet or roughage. Such a diet breeds serial flautists and being trapped in such company, forbidden to open a window and no recourse to a back door, knowing in your heart and soul the deadly explosive nature of methane gas..Terror is too mild a word.
    There is something to be said for a draughty old barn of a house.
                                                                     Biff
    But insulate,,insulate , insulate
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biff
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« Reply #35 on: December 08, 2018, 08:47:20 AM »

The poor character above,
                          Who put a padlock and chain on his front door was factual, The rest could well be neigh blatant fiction. When people such as Paul put their money on Passive House design and go for it , is a very brave step into the future and one that will pay massive dividends. i was born some 20 years too early. That did not stop me implementing some of the best moves into my own building designs. I think that any builder worth his salt strives for improvement.
  Then we come to the horse hair and lime crete for the floors. I am not so sure of that. I would prefer something that could cope with floodwater,even in houses well clear of the flood planes. We can get snow and we can get thaw but these days we are getting them one after the other in very quick succession and flooding is occurring in places which normally not have that problem. The snow above quickly turns to water while the ice below stays put. So firm regulations must adhere to the old 160mm upstand in external door opening. There must be some way around that for wheel chairs. A few years back we enjoyed a 22 million extension to our local hospital in L kenny but even I knew that the engineers and architects were fast asleep on their feet because the rear main entrance tarmac was level with the inside floor. I remember saying to Mrs Biff, "Opps,,Crikee this is not right".The car park was built over a burn and cut out of the hill with three sides facing the rear entrance of the Hospital. We made world news with that farce. The way things are going in the world at present means we have to adapt out building designs to be more storm proof and flood proof. Passive house and it,s recycled heat, Air filters and temperature controls are here to stay. I just wish I had had the foresight to build one back then. I am exceedingly happy with what we have and would not change it. I am also very much a supporter of solid walls both inside and outside, The internals walls in this house are insulated on both sides, Not only are they sound proof but they heat up very quickly., I sincerely hope that everyone came through the storms to date in good condition.
                                 Biff
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djs63
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« Reply #36 on: December 08, 2018, 09:03:14 AM »

Biff, I can’t picture what you mean by “the internal walls are insulated on both sides”, and they heat up quickly.
Does this mean the rooms on each side of the wall have insulated walls, if so how do they heat up quickly if insulated?

Maybe I got out off bed too quickly this morning. Sorry.
David

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biff
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« Reply #37 on: December 08, 2018, 09:21:16 AM »

No Problem at all David,
                        I did the walls solid 100mm concrete block, Inside, and 300 cavity on the externals, then when the roof was on, I dry lined the house using 50mm x 25mm tanalised batons at 400mm centers, I used the heavy foil backed sheet (8 x 4), x 12mm I infilled with poly sheeting, The baton traveled up the wall is screwed to the upstairs floor joists,screwed to the wallplate and then the roof rafter. (I think of these when the storm hits from the west). All the inside walls are done the exact same way. The  8x 4s sheets have tapered edges and are screwed on, filled and taped and then run over with the trowel. Its labor intensive but i enjoyed it.The poly between the batons provides good support for the sheets. then I had the cavity pumped. The blockwork has to be plumb and straight to make it work properly. On crooked walls it is a headache, involving plugging out and hacking back, nobody likes that kind of thing but on good straight walls it is surprisingly fast and clean..
                                                                                      Biff
   The room heats up quicker because the concrete blocks in the wall do not absorb the heat immediately like they would if they were plastered, There is a definite difference.
  So internals walls are some 170mm wide overall and door frames have to be made accordingly. The batons are banged on using a 50mm hilti, surprisingly strong grip.The lecky box and conduit are done normally.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 09:33:30 AM by biff » Logged

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djs63
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« Reply #38 on: December 08, 2018, 06:34:14 PM »

ThanksBiff,
I get it now. Smiley
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rogthedodge
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« Reply #39 on: December 10, 2018, 03:54:39 PM »

Thanks again folks, ref bracknell's question above. 2nd pic above shows the chimney stack on the south west elevation. On the ground floor this has an open fire currently which will be fitted with a wood burner. To the first floor (bedroom) we assume the fireplace has been blocked but is completely obscured by fitted wardrobes, so we'll know more when the wardrobes go.

The second stack on the WNW elevation has a blocked in fireplace to the first floor and nothing on the ground floor. A bit of a concern as to what is holding up all those bricks at present, as the ground floor fireplace has been removed to allow for double doors into the conservatory. Shocked

Rog
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titan
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« Reply #40 on: December 11, 2018, 09:58:42 AM »

I think a touch of realism is required. It is a nice looking house which probably attracted you to it. Insulation will improve comfort and reduce energy costs but where to put it. External is technically the best option with the walls within the heated envelope but will completely change the dwelling's appearance. Internally you could dry line but this will reduce all the room sizes depending on how much insulation you use. It also can create damp problems in the future dependent on a lot of unknowns with solid walls.  Roof insulation and windows are less problematic. All heat pumps work best at lowish flow temperatures, lower the better, and need to match the building's heat loss. without significant insulation a building of your age will not be suitable for using a heat pump. As a suggestion I would first do the calculations for the heat lost as accurately as possible it is simple enough to do a spreadsheet where you can change the data to show the effect of adding insulation and whether it is cost effective.   
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kristen
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« Reply #41 on: December 11, 2018, 04:44:42 PM »

I think a touch of realism is required.

Good post. All points spot-on Smiley
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« Reply #42 on: December 11, 2018, 04:45:55 PM »

titan,

Potential issues with both damp and radon were the reasons I suggested internal framing. It isn't perfect as you will always have some air movement the other side of the insulation and every electrical socket/ light switch etc. is a cold bridge but it is probably the best overall outcome. Yes you lose space in each room, in our worst case it would be 75mm on each of the three external walls.

We still have 50% of downstairs to convert to fully insulated and framed c/w UFH heating but we are getting there.

It is very difficult when you buy a property like this as so much needs doing and there is no best way of doing it only a sequence of what can be best be described as least worst options.

We started with the oil fired Stanley and I knew I wanted to go the heat pump route. In 2001 heat pump availability wasn't what it is now and it was also a different ball game in terms of financing so we ended up fitting a state of the art LPG condensing boiler for what ended up being 15 years as a 'temporary' stop gap.

We still have a way to go but we are getting there and the heat pump is coping admirably.

Regards

Richard
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« Reply #43 on: December 11, 2018, 05:49:13 PM »

     "As the ground floor fireplace  has been removed  to allow for double doors into the  conservatory. "
          Sorry Rog I almost missed that completely. It might be a very good idea to  investigate how the support steel has been used and what kind of pads it is bearing on before you proceed.it is much easier  to  correct now if the need be. Lifting a floorboard  or two and a good bright torch should reassure you.
       Biff
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