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Author Topic: Small car for senior citizen  (Read 2190 times)
Bodidly
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« on: December 10, 2018, 02:07:49 PM »

My dad is getting on in years and now does very few miles but due to living remotely a car is very handy. He is currently driving a large diesel estate which has barely warmed up by the time he has reached his destination. He would like to downsize but something which is easy to get in and out of ie upright would be good. Max journey would probably be a hilly 30 miles. Some get up and go would be preferable. Milage will be very very low so is it worth him going electric and if so where should we start? If not electric what are the greenest ICE options?

Thanks
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camillitech
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« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2018, 02:47:24 PM »

Something like Phoebe,



Bo, lovely and easy to get in and out of and great on the hills, pretty pish everywhere else right enough but you'd be amazed what you could carry up and down those hills  Grin



Seriously though, for short trips on minor roads the wee Daihatsu takes some beating. Great stance and no having to pull yourself off the floor every time you get out the driving seat. Old Phoebe is SORNed now and restricted to duties about the croft but she makes a great four wheel drive shed and is a lot warmer than a quad  hysteria
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 02:49:02 PM by camillitech » Logged

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biff
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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2018, 03:07:32 PM »

Daihatsu  Sirion  is an excellent  little car with a good upright driving position.  Great economy and even good on all round journies. Mrs Biff likes hers a lot.
         Biff
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2018, 03:51:14 PM »

Budget?

Most BEVs would do that, but decent ones still seem to demand £5-6k.  Batteries are likely no longer under warranty - if so that could be an expensive repair, if it were to fail!  Clearly not a ‘battery lease’ as they would not be worth it.

Not much servicing, apart from MOT, no annual tax and cheap to charge (particularly if on E7), but slightly more to insure.
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Bodidly
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« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2018, 05:14:11 PM »

Budget?



I cant say for sure but bet he would go up to 12K ie smart new ICE territory

No Daihatsu dealers near by so not sure that's a goer sadly. I forgot to say there must be auto option.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2018, 06:16:33 PM by Bodidly » Logged
offthegridandy
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« Reply #5 on: December 10, 2018, 06:08:15 PM »

We purchased in the spring a Dacia Duster with selectable 4X4.  Prices start <£10K lovely little car 50 MPG , Nice high seat so far it's been a winner.  SWMBO ised to drive a petrol Trooper, this car is being paid for on the fuel savings alone.  Worth a look.

Andy
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biff
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« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2018, 07:21:27 PM »

Daca has a great name here for reliability  and economy.
    I know a few people who bought them the stepsides and say that they are first class.
          Biff
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marshman
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« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2018, 07:49:03 PM »

Another +1 for  Dacia My brother bought a Sandero about 6 months ago. Very basic by todays standards, but also "conventional" and simple (lift the bonnet and you can see the engine Shocked). It has a nice high seating position so no climbing "up" out of the car. Our dad is now getting on a bit and has a Ford Fusion and thought the Sandero was OK to get in and out of.

Probably not the "greenest" around in terms of emissions but if the mileage is really low that won't matter as much and as the car is simple without the gizmos its "footprint" from being manufactured will be less to start with.

Personally for an elderly person I would still clear of anything "new" i.e electric or a modern hybrid/ICE with bells 'n' whistles. a) they all seem overly complex to me and b) the visibility always seems appalling with limited rear visibility, massive thick windscreen pillars and high waist lines. Keep it simple then there is less risk of "getting confused" and hitting the wrong pedal.
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kristen
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« Reply #8 on: December 11, 2018, 06:55:03 AM »

My Father in Law is 82 and asks about a BEV replacement now-and-then. I haven't found one that I think suitable, but the thing he particularly seems attracted to is "plug it in when you get home". He's rural, although not too far to go to fill up, but presumably he finds that a chore (although I'll ask him). Definitely a benefit ...

But he has the most simplest of mobile phones we could find ... he's sharp and used TECH before retirement (albeit that's 20 years ago ...) but even so all the "stuff" that gets added to TECH annoys me, let alone him! so I can see anything brand new, BEV in particular, being a challenge.

What I'd like for him is a self-driving car; he shouldn't be driving ... and he isn't going to get any better. But there is no public transport of any type where he lives.
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Bodidly
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« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2018, 07:47:03 AM »

My Father in Law is 82 and asks about a BEV replacement now-and-then. I haven't found one that I think suitable, but the thing he particularly seems attracted to is "plug it in when you get home". He's rural, although not too far to go to fill up, but presumably he finds that a chore (although I'll ask him). Definitely a benefit ...

But he has the most simplest of mobile phones we could find ... he's sharp and used TECH before retirement (albeit that's 20 years ago ...) but even so all the "stuff" that gets added to TECH annoys me, let alone him! so I can see anything brand new, BEV in particular, being a challenge.

What I'd like for him is a self-driving car; he shouldn't be driving ... and he isn't going to get any better. But there is no public transport of any type where he lives.

Sounds very similar. I wish I could talk him into using Taxis but it's just not in his DNA and not going to change him now. Driving is probably good for him it's the others I am worried about!

marshman. Good points about visibility. Looking around I think super minis or super mini MPVs. Dacia is an option as there is good garage near by and their simplicity would be good.

Keep it coming all its a great help  Smiley
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kristen
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« Reply #10 on: December 11, 2018, 08:47:35 AM »

I wish I could talk him into using Taxis but it's just not in his DNA

I haven't investigated that, I just think of it has being hugely inconvenient.  Book a taxi at 10AM to go ... that part is fine ... but coming home? He might well get distracted doing something unexpected.  However, maybe Uber is widespread in my area and arrive on-demand in 5 minutes. A taxi certainly wouldn't be ... might be if he was in the Big Town, but 50% of his trips are to small town/large village shopping and amenities, and a Taxi would be dispatched from big Town and take 20 minutes to get there ... to then take him the 10 minutes home

Is there a way to find what the average wait-time would be for Uber in a particular area?  If half-decent that would definitely focus my attention.

Other thing I find disappointing. He would pay a Spotty Youth, in his village, to chauffeur him around, in his car.  Spotty Youth would then have an hour or two to kill in Local Town and/or use of the car, which presumably would be worthwhile ... but no such Spotty Youth could be found - even though basic raw material is not in short supply!
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Barrie
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« Reply #11 on: December 11, 2018, 09:20:10 AM »

Mmm, many spotty youths don't have driving licences nowadays, perhaps different in the sticks but those growing up with public transport in big towns don't see the need and don't have a mini fortune to spare.

My cousin drives a Sandero which she says is easy to drive has lots of space and the dealer is good but it's very basic.

SWMBO drives a Suzuki Celerio which again is a very easy to access boxy car. It's very economical even though it never goes more than ten miles from home. It has lots of kit including hands free, stop start, dab radio, electric front windows, air-con and the dealer is brilliant. Our only reservation three years ago was that it didn't have a good NCAP score but then we discovered that it was miles better than the Punto it was replacing.

Uncle drives a Honda Jazz which has been utterly reliable and is also high up but without being difficult to get in and out of.

Father drove a Fiesta until he stopped driving at the age of 90, the Titanium model wouldn't be within the budget but does have all the bells and whistles. It had a very wide cill so it wasn't easy for my mother to get in and out of.

We decided that for an elderly driver the three essentials were an auto gear box, air conditioning and nowadays lane departure warning, the first two assist in making the driving easier for those with heart or physical movement issues whilst the latter is a real safety aid.
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #12 on: December 11, 2018, 09:31:59 AM »

Does ‘lane deparure warning’ work on hilly country lanes?
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chasfromnorfolk
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« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2018, 09:57:30 AM »

 ‘easy to get in and out of’ was a consideration with Mrs Chas changing from her V40 estate... chose a VW Golf Plus. Also, for the first time in her life, an auto. A significant degree higher, more economical, good build (the car, the car) no complaints after nearly a year. Thinking about it, probably more space than the estate...

Chas
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todthedog
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« Reply #14 on: December 11, 2018, 10:08:31 AM »

 We had the very base model sandero. Very cheap not sure that going to a more highly speced model is such good value. Ours was very reliable and cheap to maintain, no bells and whistles but decent storage and easy to get in and out . Fuel economy not brilliant.

Back in the UK we have a i10 hyundai only 900cc but runs fine on a motor way and is good on fuel. The boot is large enough for a border collie one of the reasons for choosing it, £20 a year tax, it is 2014 and it falls into the lowest insurance catagory. I am not very flexible and no problems for me getting in and out
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