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Author Topic: Insect-based dog food is launched  (Read 470 times)
stannn
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« on: January 10, 2019, 06:54:39 AM »

https://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/3069061/chowing-down-on-carbon-insect-based-dog-food-launches
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freddyuk
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« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2019, 07:53:57 AM »

Well I looked hoping it would be sustainable financially but sadly feeding 2 English Setters at £89 per 12.5kg is about 6 times what we pay for our dry food at the moment which is supplemented with fish oil and veggies. They are very happy. I suspect other new retailers will be more competitive but it would need to be far cheaper to be successful except for special needs dogs.
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HalcyonRichard
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« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2019, 08:10:44 AM »

I thought the vast majority of meat in petfood was waste or by product from the farming and meat processing industries. Not sure what advantage to the environment will be gained by this.

Richard
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knighty
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« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2019, 10:03:24 AM »

I thought the vast majority of meat in petfood was waste or by product from the farming and meat processing industries. Not sure what advantage to the environment will be gained by this.
Richard

it is (I make dog food for a living)

but... demand/prices for the 'good stuff' have been rising quickly the last few years, there's more and more being exported for people to eat... the kind of thing we used to eat here but don't anymore (tripe, liver, heart, kidney etc.)  (my tripe prices have gone up 3000% compared to 10 years ago - 3000 is not a typo)

dry food is made out of the waste that's no good for much else, bones, heads, feet, anything smelly, anything that fell on the floor / has been condemned etc. - it's all cooked to the point it doesn't really matter what you put in it all comes out the same    (tho they're not allowed some stuff, if the paperwork/passport for an animal goes missing they have to send it for incineration)

I think the whole insect thing is a bit of a gimmick, aimed at people who have a bit too much money and think it's trendy/cool to be/look environmentally friendly.... but don't insects produce a massive amount of methane gas?

lab grown meat will be the real game changer... but I think we're a long way off before it becomes profitable.... once it is giant meat growing factories will spring up fast
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oliver90owner
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2019, 03:01:36 PM »

As an aside, pedigree pet foods were occasionally tested by the company owners (Mars) before BSE came along.  If it wasn’t good enough for humans, it wasn’t good enough for your pets.  Things have changed over the last thirty years.
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2019, 03:29:03 PM »

I watched zome of the program about the river Nile (BBC4 ?)and one of the things that caught my attention was that at a certain time of year one species of fly swarms and the locals gather the flies by whatever means and make insect burgers out of them. The swarming only last a few days iirc, but there is 4 times as much protein in an insect burger compared to an equivalent beef burger. Perhaps insects are the future of food - well for those that can stomach them
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MeatyFool
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« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2019, 04:02:47 PM »

Saw a similar programme some years ago about a seasonal fly swarm on a lake in sub-sahara Africa.  the swarm was so thick and big that it could make day turn to dusk.

Same thing there: locals would use nets to catch masses of flies and then compressed into burgers.

To be honest, if the flies are small enough, you aren't going to notice crunchy carapaces, and wings getting between your teeth!  With a binder (such as egg), the burger would likely hold firm like any meat burger.

Given that burgers have plenty of other additional ingredients beyond just the meat, I suspect it would be possible to get someone to eat a fly burger and not even realise it.

Check out videos about Impossible Burgers.  If they can get a vegetarian product look and taste like meat, it must be possible to turn a fly based burger into something that passes muster!

Meatyfool..
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billi
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« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2019, 05:30:14 PM »

 in principal , i find that a good idea , including us humans   to address overpopulation ,  and  having pets  is kind of a luxury , that i think can be seen nowadays  a bit controversial    horror

i will never get a cat again ,  am not a dog lover because of my youth  as an  activ  sports runner  through german forests  i was pretty much  annoyed  with dogs and their holders and how dogs are kept  ,  good that i had my irish rehabilitation years , as dogs in Ireland are kept differently 


not sure how much i can trust that article , but in principle ,  i know there is a lot of resources of that planet going into the well being of pets , while we cannot care enough about our own problems

A bee is my pet , a butterfly , rain worm , a nematode , ladybird larve  and so on

Billi
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camillitech
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« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2019, 07:51:58 PM »

I thought the vast majority of meat in petfood was waste or by product from the farming and meat processing industries. Not sure what advantage to the environment will be gained by this.

Richard

There probably isn't as far as pet food goes. However I think this is driven by a desire to find something more sustainable to feed salmon, bassa and prawns without hoovering up two tons of anchovies, sand eels, herring etc to make one ton of fish https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/02/salmon-insect-feed-fish-meal-netherlands/ wackoold Sadly (much as I am a fan of the EU) much of this has been held back by (now withdrawn or modified) EU legislation that forbade the use of insects as feed for some reason.
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knighty
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« Reply #9 on: January 11, 2019, 11:28:30 AM »

As an aside, pedigree pet foods were occasionally tested by the company owners (Mars) before BSE came along.  If it wasn’t good enough for humans, it wasn’t good enough for your pets.  Things have changed over the last thirty years.

fit for human consumption, and a person actually wanting to eat it are very different things

they use whatever they can get chep, mush it up, pump it into tubes (a bit like a giant plastic sausage), cook it, pull it out of the plastic and then dice it up

to be fair... that's the same process used to make cheap sliced meat/chicken in supermarkets or little cubes of meat (pizza toppings etc.)


once it's canned it's heated up to sterilise it again (I think all caned food is treated like this but not 100% on that)

so it's technically 'safe' to eat, in the same way pretty much anything is if you cook/sterilise it first


I'm not against it... it's good to make use of the useless bits, but the advertising irks me :-o
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Philip R
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« Reply #10 on: January 11, 2019, 02:47:34 PM »

I saw the programme on Lake Victoria some two years ago on Aunty Beeb. Those tasty insect patty burgers, very nutricious you say. What did the midges feast on before they were netted. Did they suck the blood of the humans or livestock on shore, or did they feed on dung and faeces, yuk.  If the former, then eating the midge burgers would classify the person eating them as a cannibal or vampire!

These farmed insects used for dog food, what was their protein source? I Missed it.

A few years ago I was working in China. The canteen food was an eye opener, the locals were eating fish offal on top of their rice. I was not feeling good when I saw it. I Had chewy gristly bits of pork and chicken instead. Feet and trotters, tasted OK, not much meat though.
The orientals dont waste anything off a carcass.
Philip R,
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