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Author Topic: PV module prices fell by almost one third in 2018.  (Read 903 times)
kristen
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« Reply #15 on: March 27, 2019, 12:09:09 PM »

I can't help wondering what things our politicians might have been focusing on if it wasn't massive amount of time that appears to have been expended through the B word.....

To my mind that's just a recent distraction; Lobbying and Vested Interest more likely the problem.  I think all New Build should be Passive House - 7% extra capital cost and close to zero heating cost ... for the lifetime of the building ... and health benefits that would reduce sick-days and be reflected in GDP.  Stick PV on the roof, as you suggest, and the combination must make a dramatic difference, over time, to how much energy we have to import, or produce, for domestic consumption.  Reduces all the problems that huge balance of payments difference e.g. with Arabia causes, let alone if we decide to go to war to "protect supply" ..

... and of course because we are not doing that all the poor people that are buying New Builds will be having the huge cost, and turmoil, of having to upgrade them in the future.

I was going to say "don't get me started" ... bit late though, sorry about that, I'll get my coat Smiley
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dimengineer
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« Reply #16 on: March 27, 2019, 02:01:05 PM »

I'd point out that they wont face the turmoil in the future - they just wont do it at all! They will just grumble.

The other point perhaps is that an awful lot of people won't put up (or aren't prepared to) with a Passive House. They will want Gas Central Heating, Be able to open windows, turn off the MHRV then complain about the damp.

Irrational, perhaps, but there is a long slow education process to go through first
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21 tube Kloben Panel/250L Megaflow, 1.68kWp Solar PV - 7 x 240W Sanyo Panels. Morso Squirrel WBS
dimengineer
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« Reply #17 on: March 27, 2019, 02:03:29 PM »

And an easier & cheaper install, on your large bungalow roof
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21 tube Kloben Panel/250L Megaflow, 1.68kWp Solar PV - 7 x 240W Sanyo Panels. Morso Squirrel WBS
kristen
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« Reply #18 on: March 27, 2019, 02:55:03 PM »

The other point perhaps is that an awful lot of people won't put up (or aren't prepared to) with a Passive House.

We have new (last few years) social housing in the village. A knock-down-rebuild of what was there before ("council houses" I presume). Solar Panels on roof and I think the central heating is ground-source ... the occupants say it is far too hot in winter and have the windows open. No idea if it is badly designed, lack of education, config issues, or Subsidy-Kickback that favours "unmetered, over use/abuse" for max subsidy ... so you may well be right.

But we haven't had a single person here who wasn't impressed, including some who arrived  for a look-see sceptical (e.g Architect for their cherished project was anti with a list of negative points "Do you want to live in a plastic bag"), and others who had no knowledge of Passive House who then went on to build and move into a Passive House and are now champions of their own.

The only problem with opening a window is that in Summer you let heat in, and in Winter you let heat out Smiley On days when it isn't Arctic / Baking then by all means ... but after you deal with the dust and flies that come in those folk may well decide that the lovely MVHR air quality is actually a better deal. I don't know how much air the MVHR pumps through, but I suspect its on a par with a draughty old Georgian wreck Smiley

We have heating in ours because we already had (Biomass) boiler in old part of the house, so we are able to keep it at a toasty 22C in winter for which the heating effort is minute (but needs a heat source of course - getting a dozen mates round each cold Winters evening would do just as well ...)
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