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Author Topic: AHSP in Old House  (Read 6305 times)
Warble
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« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2019, 02:17:45 PM »

"SmartRad"s are an alternative to UFH at lower water temperatures.
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TT
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« Reply #31 on: June 07, 2019, 02:38:03 PM »

what about updating insulation, improving window  and door draught proofing
going all electric, less hassle to install, easy to operate, supplement with more PV  to offset costs.
PV with diverter for immersion for heating hot water, ditch oil, tank etc
depend is the folks can deal with the hassle with all this, some people cope better than others with having carpets lifted, floorboards up, trades, in, disruption etc.
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NugentS
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« Reply #32 on: June 07, 2019, 10:42:45 PM »

Thank you to all who commented.
The project has been shelved. Parents are not going to live long enough for this sort of work to be worth doing (their words)

We had several companies turn up and look around. Some of which just wanted to sell an ASHP with no consideration as to whether it would work well or not. Our last visitor was brutally honest about everything and came across extremely well, knowledgeable and skilled and her advice matched what people from this forum were saying and my own inexpert opinion - that it just wasn't gonna work - not without spending a bucket load of money on insulation and other stuff as well.

Regards

Sean

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gnarly
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« Reply #33 on: June 09, 2019, 08:32:06 AM »

Really interesting thread, thanks for asking NugentS !

I came across this Radio 4 'Costing the earth' podcast about gas boilers - there's a bit on hybrid heat pump / boilers starting at 17:00 in

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0003qy0

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Home Farm
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« Reply #34 on: July 19, 2019, 07:50:05 AM »

A well insulated house is key to the efficiency of ASHPs. If your house leaks heat, ASHPs, from our initial experience, will not be effective. We installed our ASHP in a farm house built in the 1800s, but we have double glazing throughout and heavy wall insulation. So far, the pump has been very effective.
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« Reply #35 on: July 19, 2019, 03:21:51 PM »

Further to my previous, for those that are interested, you can see an overview of our air source heat pump, which will helpfully answer questions:

 https:// youtu.be/P2tnW4rZl68

More info is available here: http://myhomefarm.co.uk/moving-from-oil-to-air-source-central-heating
« Last Edit: July 26, 2019, 07:59:01 AM by Home Farm » Logged

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gnarly
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« Reply #36 on: July 19, 2019, 06:12:10 PM »

Home farm: YouTube links should have a space inserted in the URL otherwise  a quirk of the bulletin board software means it disappears !  Looking forward to watching it !!!
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Home Farm
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« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2019, 09:29:18 PM »

Thanks gnarly. Not really sure if I understand what you meant. Should it be http:// space then link? Ie. Http:// YouTubelink.

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GarethC
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« Reply #38 on: July 22, 2019, 09:49:44 AM »

"SmartRad"s are an alternative to UFH at lower water temperatures.

I take it you mean essentially radiators with fan coils, and decent control systems? This appears the logical answer. UFH is expensive and disruptive to install. Conventional radiators need to be unfeasibly large to operate at low enough temps (high enough COPs) - often it's not doubling, but quadrupling the size, or more, of current rads to get sufficient heat transfer.

Smart rads should provide much higher heat transfer in compact sizes. I'd like to look into these. Can anyone suggest suppliers?

The ability to simply swap existing 'dumb' radiators for these when installing a heat pump should save cost, time and hassle. Is it doable? If you use existing pipework, though, can pipes always circulate the low temperature (say 45 degrees) water fast enough to deliver sufficient heat? That's the main issue I can think of.
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JonG
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« Reply #39 on: July 22, 2019, 03:13:40 PM »

Smith's ecovectors and Jaga DBE's are most common I would say, but they are costly, can get noisy as they age and dust is sometimes an issue depending on dwelling cleanliness!
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GarethC
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« Reply #40 on: July 23, 2019, 08:38:13 AM »

Thanks Jon. Also found dimplex units. Surely not expensive compared to installing UFH?

What about pipework? Think existing stuff will tend to do?
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #41 on: July 23, 2019, 09:31:25 AM »

If you central heating radiators work on normal 22/15mm pipe there is a chance that will suffice, if they are plumbed in microbore 8/10mm you could be dissapointed as the flow rate with the much lower tempreture water needs to be much higher to get the same amount of heat out the radiators.
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GarethC
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« Reply #42 on: July 23, 2019, 02:12:58 PM »

Yes, do heat pumps even 'accept' microbore I wonder? I think the flow rate would have to be several times that used with a conventional boiler.

I suppose another positive, if existing pipes do work, is that only a fraction as much heat is wasted/lost 'en route' from the pump given the lower flow temp compared to conventional boilers (perhaps three quarters less?).
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Countrypaul
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« Reply #43 on: July 23, 2019, 02:46:12 PM »

But assuming it is all within the thermal envelope, then it is all useful heat. If the pipes go outside the thermal envelope then the heat will be presumably completely wasted.
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Home Farm
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« Reply #44 on: November 14, 2019, 03:27:57 PM »

Our ashp has been hard since the temperatures have dropped. Do I expect to see a drop in COP.
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