navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: No coal again, but...  (Read 819 times)
dan_b
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4059


WWW
« on: June 10, 2019, 01:43:27 PM »

instead, the UK is generating 200MW with an oil or OCGT plant? Not seen that online for a long time.  There's a full half of our nuclear capacity offline which won't be helping.





Logged

3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery
nowty
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 768



« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2019, 02:23:08 PM »

Gridwatch is showing OCGT running at 0.29GW presently.

Poor Solar and Wind today, low Nuclear and zero Coal.

There is still headroom from CCGT but maybe the OCGT's need running once in a while for maintenance ?
Logged

11kW+ of PV installed and 54+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
250,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
Nickel2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1690


Method mixed with Madness


« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2019, 03:13:49 PM »

Maybe parallel redundancy? When you get close to the maximum happy continuous rating, you run up another source of power to cover a peak in the event of ccgt failure.
Logged

1.140kW mono south-facing at 49*
EpEver 4210A at 24v
24V 400 Ah battery. (4x200Ah FLA)
EpEver STI1000-24-230 pure sine inverter
Of course it'll work. (It hasn't caught fire yet).
oliver90owner
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2006


« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2019, 03:20:19 PM »

Anyone know why nuclear has dropped so much?  Possible flood risk for the next couple of days or refuelling them at the same time (poor planning?)?
Logged
dan_b
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 4059


WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2019, 03:33:47 PM »

Looks like there’s a lot of them offline for refuelling and/or planned maintenance-  I guess they’re scheduled for period of lowest demand?
Logged

3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery
Moxi
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 429


« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2019, 03:37:58 PM »

EDF's UK fleet status can be found here:

https://www.edfenergy.com/energy/power-station/daily-statuses

6 reactors of for statutory inspections, 1 off for refuelling off load, 6 on nominal load * not sure about Hinkley B unit 4, HB unit 3 is raising power after statutory outage, Heysham stage 2 unit 8 low load refuelling. *Heysham stage 1 unit 2 at reduced load to manage fuel temperatures.

*When did Hinkley B units drop to 477MW as nominal output?  Their sister station is Hartlepool and they are approx. 590MW.

*I understood both Heysham stage 1 units were locked at reduced temperatures now until they cease operation due to corrosion of the coolant baffles caused by  CO2 at normal operational temperature but I wasn't aware of fuel temperature issues although they do suffer quite a bit of "ratchetting" on the AGR fuel pins at certain stations.

sorry I don't know how to post a live link - still beyond my IT skills

Moxi

oh it worked  wackoold
« Last Edit: June 10, 2019, 03:52:12 PM by Moxi » Logged
azps
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 687



WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2019, 05:15:27 PM »

EDF's UK fleet status can be found here:

https://www.edfenergy.com/energy/power-station/daily-statuses

6 reactors of for statutory inspections

If I've understood correctly, Hunterston B (2 reactors) is a lot more serious than just statutory inspections. The cracks have grown so numerous that the reactors aren't safe, under the current regulatory definition.

EDF's reaction, naturally, is to ask for that definition to be changed. To date, they've exerted strong regulatory capture, so they may well get their way.
Logged

RIT
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2003


« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2019, 06:15:52 PM »

EDF's UK fleet status can be found here:

https://www.edfenergy.com/energy/power-station/daily-statuses

6 reactors of for statutory inspections

If I've understood correctly, Hunterston B (2 reactors) is a lot more serious than just statutory inspections. The cracks have grown so numerous that the reactors aren't safe, under the current regulatory definition.

EDF's reaction, naturally, is to ask for that definition to be changed. To date, they've exerted strong regulatory capture, so they may well get their way.

This issue started to be reported yesterday with headlines such as

Quote
WARNING Glasgow and Edinburgh ‘could be contaminated with radiation and evacuated’ if cracked Hunterston B nuclear reactors are reopened

     https://www.thescottishsun.co.uk/news/4341340/glasgow-edinburgh-radiation-contamination-risk-hunterston-b-reactors-reopened/

and

Quote
Chernobyl 2.0 fears as nuclear expert warns against re-opening cracked UK reactor

     https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/chernobyl-20-fears-nuclear-expert-16479884
Logged

2.4kW PV system, output can be seen at  - https://pvoutput.org/list.jsp?userid=49083

Why bother? - well, there is no planet B
M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5054



« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2019, 08:04:04 AM »

EDF's UK fleet status can be found here:

https://www.edfenergy.com/energy/power-station/daily-statuses

6 reactors of for statutory inspections

If I've understood correctly, Hunterston B (2 reactors) is a lot more serious than just statutory inspections. The cracks have grown so numerous that the reactors aren't safe, under the current regulatory definition.

EDF's reaction, naturally, is to ask for that definition to be changed. To date, they've exerted strong regulatory capture, so they may well get their way.

This is one of the issues that often gets ignored when the long lifetime and 24/7/365 generation of nuclear is praised - they still need reviewing and often significant additional new investment as they get older, in order for them to operate 30yrs, 40yrs etc.

Can HPC operate for 60yrs, probably. Will it do so without significant maintenance, probably not.
Logged

Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
azps
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 687



WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2019, 08:07:47 AM »

This is one of the issues that often gets ignored when the long lifetime and 24/7/365 generation of nuclear is praised - they still need reviewing and often significant additional new investment as they get older, in order for them to operate 30yrs, 40yrs etc.

Can HPC operate for 60yrs, probably. Will it do so without significant maintenance, probably not.

If it starts operating, and survives through to 35 years old, it may not last much past that. EDF know the design is a dud, and with high uncertainty for some of its components. So after the CfD life is over, it may not be worth doing significant maintenance and upgrades on it.
Logged

M
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5054



« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2019, 08:30:32 AM »

This is one of the issues that often gets ignored when the long lifetime and 24/7/365 generation of nuclear is praised - they still need reviewing and often significant additional new investment as they get older, in order for them to operate 30yrs, 40yrs etc.

Can HPC operate for 60yrs, probably. Will it do so without significant maintenance, probably not.

If it starts operating, and survives through to 35 years old, it may not last much past that. EDF know the design is a dud, and with high uncertainty for some of its components. So after the CfD life is over, it may not be worth doing significant maintenance and upgrades on it.

I'll stick my neck out and say that after the CfD ends (~2065), the cost of generation for HPC probably won't be low enough to find any buyers. I'd guess that in real terms RE and probably RE + storage, will be £30-40/MWh or less*, and the cost of maintaining even a fully amortized HPC may be more.

Even demand side PV may be down at these costs with 35% efficient silicon/perovskite PV (9kWp taking up the same roof space as 4kWp of 'old' 250Wp panels).

Quick future ad - "Do you fancy adding a small pergola to your home? Then why not cover it with 4.5kWp of PV while you are at?"
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 08:33:57 AM by M » Logged

Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
Stig
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 452


« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2019, 09:46:42 AM »

It's OK, the new Sizewell reactor will be 'cheaper' than Hinkley as we'll all chip in with the funding:

from https://www.ipswichstar.co.uk/news/edf-new-funding-plans-for-sizewell-c-1-6098792

Quote
Energy giant EDF is set to put forward a new plan to help finance Sizewell C which would see UK energy customers make contributions to help reduce interest costs on the project.

The plans, which would see every energy customer pay around £6 a year, could help reduce the overall price of the project to £16billion, rather than the £20bn set aside for Sizewell C's sister site in Hinkley.

(heard on BBC radio news this morning, this was the only article I could find about it)
« Last Edit: June 11, 2019, 09:50:04 AM by Stig » Logged
Pile-o-stone
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 54


« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2019, 10:00:41 AM »

"Around 370 hairline fractures were found, which the BBC reports equates to about one in every 10 bricks in the reactor core.

EDF Energy said these have now grown to an average of 2mm wide."

That's OK, Grand Designs presenter Kevin McCloud once said on his program that you only need to worry about the cracks you can fit your hand in.

Phew.
Logged

5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
Philip R
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1444


« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2019, 10:07:11 AM »

All the oil burning steam plants have gone. Only a bit of ocgt.
Hartlepool and heysham1 reactors cannot fuel on load.just before refuelling, load is lost due to the burnup state of the fuel.once shutdown, lots of fuel syringers added and some radial shuffling done to enhance the flux profile and bur up when on load.
When returned to power, takes a while to form enough fission product poison to reduce fuel reactivity. Until this happens, control rods still quite well inserted in top of core. Hence reduced output. As the fission products form. They increase local neutron absorption and the rods withdraw, power goes up.
All the other plants bar SZB refuel at part load,thus maintaining better burnup of the fuel.

The headline cracked reactor infers to me that the pressure vessel is compromised, which it is not. The graphite blocks have big stresses and some cracked. The concern is fuell channel and control rod channel integrity, ie.a bit not falling out and blocking it.
Philip R.
Logged
djs63
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 338


« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2019, 11:16:42 AM »

Where are the cracks in the Hunterston reactor. The EDF site says that they are checking the graphite. Does this mean that this is where the cracks are? Not in the pressure containment vessel?

If the the new reactors have a life of whatever to keep the bean counters happy, someone still has to decommission, ie cope with the radioactive waste and equipment.

This morning it seems that EDF is going to charge their customers £6 surcharge to fund nuclear (BBC), per year?
Logged

6 Kw Proven wind turbine, 15 Navitron evacuated solar hot water tube array and 1.8 Kw PV, grid connected (SMA inverters) and GSHP supplying radiators and UFH. Wood burning stove (Esse 300) and oil fired Rayburn. Rainwater harvesting 4000 litre tank underground. Nissan Leaf
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!