navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address - following recent spam/hack attempts on the forum, all security is set to "high", and "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: PV / Desalination plant  (Read 259 times)
Nickel2
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1742


Method mixed with Madness


« on: July 10, 2019, 09:18:15 AM »

The 'scientists' have developed a way of combining PV panels with desalination to get drinking water and electricity. There is a company called MedAd Technologies that has been onto this for a few years now, in Singapore, with research at KAUST in Saudi Arabia.
Think what you could do with your muddy back-yard ditch and a small handful of panels...    Smiley

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-48910569
Logged

1.140kW mono south-facing at 49*
EpEver 4210A at 24v
24V 400 Ah battery. (4x200Ah FLA)
EpEver STI1000-24-230 pure sine inverter
Of course it'll work. (It hasn't caught fire yet).
Westie
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 572


« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2019, 12:02:52 PM »

I've often thought about adding a heat exchanger to the back of a PV panel, you then have a source of hot water and a more efficient PV panel.

Logged

4kwp south facing array  SMA 4000TL grid connected.  2x30tube Navitron solar thermal panels (east/west). Arada 5kw S/C WBS. 25000Ltr underground rain water tank. KTM E-Bike  Cool
azps
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 717



WWW
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2019, 06:31:49 PM »

I've often thought about adding a heat exchanger to the back of a PV panel, you then have a source of hot water and a more efficient PV panel.

Yeah, people have built hybrid solar OV-thermal panels. They've reached the market. They've never really done well at all.

And now PV is so cheap, and zero-maintenance, that it no longer makes sense to try!
Logged

Philip R
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1504


« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2019, 07:53:01 PM »

Most on the energy landing on a PV panel ends up heating the thing. So much so that it reduced the power output of the panel. My 3.5kW system derates to 2.8kW after a good sun soak. cold sunny spring day and power is greater than its rating, even if the sun azimuth is less optimal. Cooling of a PV would have great benefits.I would be summising a copper serpentine water or refridgerant pipe bonded to a flat copper or aluminium plate on the back of the PV. It would increase the cost way more than buying more PV, which is basically what AZPS has said just before.

The methodolgy of cooling is the problem. A typical domestic situation with PV installed would boil the hot water cylinder with energy input availible from the PV panels roof area. So what to do with the heat.  Store it underground and extract it during the winter, even if most of it has leaked away. Forum went there about 7 years ago!!! fume
cool it with an air blast heat exchanger, then you are using the PV extra captured output as electricity to cool it down again, a bit of a waste.

So yes the solar PV desalination plant sounds great. The Saudis use a significant proportion of their oil production to run steam power plant, ( to run air con) and loads of gas to run the desalination plants. Using this system could conserve the oil or improve their balance of payments situation, which has not been good lately.

It offers a great solution for places in Africa, Australia and the south western United States ( Arizona in particular- even though it is landlocked). The planet surface area is 71% sea water, and a lot of that surrounds sunny climes, so it is a no brainer.

Philip R
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!