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Author Topic: A look at components for the Tesla Roof.  (Read 2343 times)
stannn
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« on: August 08, 2019, 07:11:01 PM »

https://cleantechnica.com/2019/08/08/an-inside-look-at-the-components-that-go-into-a-tesla-solar-roof-installation/
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« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2019, 09:59:37 PM »

That's a good lesson in how to put lipstick onna flyingpig Stannn!
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dan_b
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« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2019, 10:16:10 AM »

It does seem a lot of effort and complexity for aesthetics
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biff
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« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2019, 11:10:37 AM »

No  NO  No,
            This is all wrong. This is like boring a hole in the bottom of the boat to let the water out. The tile weeps so not allow for dust residue and yearly debris building up and keeping those roofs cool is simply impossible. There is no interior membrane and no way of insulating. It is nonsense and as the years go by, it will be proved to be nonsense. It is all show.
                              Biff
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2019, 11:24:44 AM »

Don't worry about it Biffer its a promo stunt. It's not viable tech. Its a step removed from solar freakin' roads.
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2019, 06:43:31 PM »

No  NO  No,
            This is all wrong. This is like boring a hole in the bottom of the boat to let the water out. The tile weeps so not allow for dust residue and yearly debris building up and keeping those roofs cool is simply impossible. There is no interior membrane and no way of insulating. It is nonsense and as the years go by, it will be proved to be nonsense. It is all show.
                              Biff

I've not watched the video yet, but they do plan for serious install numbers in the next year and going forward.
Tesla rarely fails even if their schedules slip...
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Sprinter
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« Reply #6 on: August 12, 2019, 09:58:42 AM »

I might be being a bit controversial here, but in light of all of the posts so far that are dead set against this as a "bad idea" (for whatever reason) i think its a good idea and will be the future.

Now like all fledgling technologies the initial deployed iteration of the technology has some flaws, and in time with sufficient installs and economics, these flaws will be ironed out, improved upon or removed and this technology will enter Version 2 as a standard, followed by 3,4,5 Etc and then it will become mainstream.

To be fair 3 or 4 years ago i saw very similar comments on Battery installations as a mainstream household appliance, Bad Idea, cr*p, will never work, only forklift batteries are cost effective, look at how inefficient they are Etc. Etc Etc. but a couple of years on those batteries are becoming more of a mainstream household appliance, sure i admit they (batteries) are probably only at the V2 or nearly V3 stage of their development through to normality, but they will become mainstream.

And so will the solar roof, rather than po-pooing the whole idea i am thankful that there is a forward thinking company out there that is pushing the boundaries with an eye on a great end game, even if the short term game leaves something to be desired.

Now imagine the future when someone is smart enough to specify that planning for all new builds must include heat pumps, batteries and solar roofs, not only will our planet have a minor sigh of relief but the technology will drop in price making retrofits more cost effective, a very negative forum sometimes.

Though that could just be due to it being Monday morning.


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Scruff
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« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2019, 12:26:03 PM »

Tesla rarely fails even if their schedules slip...

Electric Truck. Never gonna happen...


To be fair 3 or 4 years ago i saw very similar comments on Battery installations as a mainstream household appliance, Bad Idea, cr*p, will never work, only forklift batteries are cost effective, look at how inefficient they are Etc. Etc Etc. but a couple of years on those batteries are becoming more of a mainstream household appliance, sure i admit they (batteries) are probably only at the V2 or nearly V3 stage of their development through to normality, but they will become mainstream.

Has their viability been proven or otherwise?
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dan_b
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« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2019, 12:37:40 PM »

Tesla's Electric "Semi" is happening, and the prospect of a fully electric HGV tractor has already provoked other proper HGV manufacturers to start their own BEV HGV programmes.  DAF, Volvo, Renault and Mercedes are all in active development with BEV HGVs of various classes.   Electrification of freight is probably a more important transport equation to solve than that of passenger vehicles really considering how reliant all economies are on "moving stuff".

Yes it will be "late" according to Elon-time, and yes it will have a higher acquisition cost than an equivalent diesel tractor.  Yes the battery pack will be so large in weight terms as to effectively reduce the maximum load carrying capacity of the overall rig (but then many HGV journeys are not fully weight-laden), and yes there will need to be an escalation of even higher-power charging infrastructure - but for well-planned and known regular freight routes with existing freight depots, this is not a difficult problem to solve.

Or do you prefer all our goods to still be shifted around in diesel HGVs achieving 4MPG, probably all the while cheating on their emissions levels like the diesel car motors?


As to batteries - grid-scale batteries are proven viable, useful and economic already - just look at South Australia.  New market models are being developed now to enable consumers with domestic batteries to join in "virtual power plants" and/or smart export tariff schemes. It's extremely novel tech and a nacent market.  But again, what would you prefer as an alternative? 

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Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
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« Reply #9 on: August 12, 2019, 01:40:19 PM »


Or do you prefer all our goods to still be shifted around in diesel HGVs achieving 4MPG, probably all the while cheating on their emissions levels like the diesel car motors?


Or having a low-pollution driving engine but a totally unregulated stinky engine running the refrigeration...
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Sprinter
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« Reply #10 on: August 12, 2019, 02:53:12 PM »

Quote
Has their viability been proven or otherwise?

Now that depends on the interpretation of viability that we all have, and everyone of us has probably a different opinion on what it means, ranging from, yep its proven and it works = Viable, though to is it cost effectiveness, i suspect many here are thinking about cost effectiveness and does it have a pay back period, in which case the edges get all bleary.



But anyway a quick look at the web page of the device that i have in my garage, yep, its viable alright, i guess that page proves that its viable as well as its currently shaking its stuff.

Does not ever mean that it is cost effective though, and i am not sure if it will ever pay for itself, and whilst i accept that everyone is an individual and has their own opinion (which they are entitled too) and definition of what is and what is not viable, for me a pay back period was not essential. I also eluded earlier to the state of batteries at the moment probably being V2 (definitely early adopter) but later on as the technology is refined and matures the price comes down it will be cost effective as well. And at that point they will certainly be installed in most houses (new builds certainly).

In fact i would go as far as to say that if i lived my life based on "pay back periods" or " Return on Investment" then for me life would be very boring, especially when it comes to fishing as i probably catch 40 worth of fish per year, but to do that i have hundreds of worth of kit and buy a further 10 a week on average for bait which i proceed to through into the sea Smiley

Maybe some of my fishing ROI is the enjoyment i get from the fresh air, in amazing countryside sat with my mate, or the pint in the pub after, likewise some of the ROI from the batteries may be that early adopters help push the technology through to the majority advancing our efficiency as a species (which we all need).



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dan_b
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« Reply #11 on: August 13, 2019, 10:41:06 AM »

Question is really - if you are planning on a complete new build, and you want solarPV on your roof (either through choice or legislation) and let's say you were aiming for a 6kW installation - would you now
a: build a traditional roof and install traditional pV panels on top, or
b: build a Tesla solar roof?

This surely is the only time when that Tesla solar roof decision is going to be made?   So what would it come down to then at that point - cost differential between a and b and how much value you attach to aesthetics?

Alternatively let's say you have a "listed building", the 100 year old roof is borked anyway and you want to add SolarPV - with the traditional panel system that simply rules it out from the start.  Is that then a genuine use case scenario for a Tesla solar roof?  It retains the original "listed look", you're rebuilding hte roof anyway, and now you've got solar?     Agree that's an edge case but maybe it's a viable one?
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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
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« Reply #12 on: August 13, 2019, 11:08:37 AM »

I'm sure we had this discussion before and someone said that it the US most roofs use shingle "tiles" which need replacing every few years so if you're having your roof re-done then replacing with PV tiles that will last for decades might make more economic sense.  That's not generally the case in the UK.
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Westie
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« Reply #13 on: August 13, 2019, 04:29:01 PM »

I'm sure we had this discussion before and someone said that it the US most roofs use shingle "tiles" which need replacing every few years so if you're having your roof re-done then replacing with PV tiles that will last for decades might make more economic sense.  That's not generally the case in the UK.

Yes, I've noticed in the mid west and Florida that they use a soft felt shingle instead of tiles as they present little or no injury risk if they get torn off  by 100+ mph winds. I wonder
how the Tesla system fares in that respect.  I seem to remember Tesla stating the solar tiles were virtually indestructible, so I wouldn't want to get hit by one!

 

« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 04:31:26 PM by Westie » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: August 13, 2019, 05:50:21 PM »


I'm sure Biff would agree, the solar tiles might be nigh on indestructable, but the stuff they are fixed onto is going to be a different matter which will place different stresses on the tile structure themselves, if its underside (presumably the soft underbelly) is exposed to forces rather than the top ..well likely "destructable"

The time between the announcement & "now" has been such a void that I think they know the grand announcement was wrong, they weren't ready, they aren't ready, & likely they will be half arsed (I don't want them to be) if ever rolled out, otherwise we'd have had tesla marketing hanging more than the regular solar panel design we are all used to in the shopping centre / mall  "E.V church of tesla"

It appears the solar tile design is incurring the continental drift effect.
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