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Author Topic: Energy provider and FiT  (Read 2879 times)
nowty
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« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2019, 11:47:40 AM »

Nowty, And presumably charging your EV. I admire your commitment to being green. Are you in the trade or have you bought all your kit retail?
Ken

Actually none of that includes charging my EV cos we only got it a couple of weeks ago now that second hand vehicles are coming within my budget.

Incredible vehicle, its the other half's but I now drive it in preference to my own if its available to me. We went on a 110 mile drive yesterday and returned back with 24% battery. Stopped off at the nearest Lidl supermarket as they have a free fast charger. Plugged it in and did a relatively small shop, only in there 15mins and when we returned to the car it had less than a minute to go to completing 80% of the battery. Returned home and plugged it in to charge it all the way slow time from my battery bank. I suspect I wont be exporting much next summer.





I am not in the trade, bought most of my stuff as cheap as possible on fleebay and use mostly second hand "faulty" Growatt batteries in my setup.

You can read here more about the system - https://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,30476.0.html
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11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
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Ted
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« Reply #16 on: August 18, 2019, 01:16:38 PM »

We use Pure Planet for our gas n electric. All renewable electricity and gas is carbon offset with tree planting and such. We pay a membership fee (£15 a month I think) and we get our energy at the wholesale price (there’s no markup by pure planet). Everything is run from an app on my phone, and you get a monthly notification to tell you to send a meter reading.

We have our FIT payments with Good Energy.

Pure Planet are not charging you the wholesale price. They are charging a price that is based on the wholesale price. In the case of electricity it is about 300% of the wholesale price.
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dan_b
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« Reply #17 on: August 18, 2019, 10:59:52 PM »

Hi Nowty loving your i3!
Also jealous of the BEV, and doubly so of having a rapid charger at Lidl!  Been doing some research and the only supermarket near met with EV charge points is Sainsburys with some unreliable (albeit free) 7kW PodPoints.  My regular Aldi doesn't have one, nor does the Lidl which is a bit further away.  Costco does also have free 7kW charge points too I've discovered though.

Apparently though it's not best practice to fully charge BEVs to 100% on a regular basis unless you're going on a "big trip" - I think the recommendation is up to 80% for regular use? Something to do with preserving battery life long term by minimising degradation?
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« Reply #18 on: August 19, 2019, 06:38:54 AM »

What batteries to BMW use, and what is the expected life?

None of our supermarkets have charging points, but extremely intrigued.
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Pile-o-stone
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« Reply #19 on: August 19, 2019, 09:52:09 AM »

Pure Planet are not charging you the wholesale price. They are charging a price that is based on the wholesale price. In the case of electricity it is about 300% of the wholesale price.

"Pure Planet customers pay no more than the firm pays for wholesale energy. A nominal monthly membership fee of £10 per fuel, which includes the standing charge, covers the company’s margin." (I believe this membership has now been reduced to £8.50).
....

"As the wholesale cost of gas and electricity fluctuates, how will Pure Planet absorb those costs?

“We aim to buy forwards to cover our customers’ predicted energy use for a long enough period of time that we can provide price stability at a retail level,” Day continues. “For example, if you bounce around on a daily rate against the wholesale price point, sometimes the rate is smooth, sometimes it’s spiky. So, do you buy every day, every hour? Do you make spot payments or buy forwards?

“We thought there must be a way to de-risk this enough so that we’re buying reasonably forwards in order to get secure price for the energy. Ultimately, we’d like to be able to independently audit this, every 12 months say, so customers can be assured that what they have paid is what we have spent. If we’ve undershot, we’ll absorb the cost; if we’ve overshot, then we’ll pass that back to consumers.”"

So they forward buy to smooth out the fluctuations, so you're correct that their prices are 'based on' wholesale not wholesale and if they buy forward and the wholesale price falls then their customers are paying more, though obv. the opposite will be true and so if the whole sale price climbs, their customers will be paying less. I guess it averages out over 12 months and they have an independent review to check.

I'm not sure where you get your 300% over wholesale price from?
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Ted
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« Reply #20 on: August 19, 2019, 10:27:31 AM »

[snip]
I'm not sure where you get your 300% over wholesale price from?

The wholesale price of electricity (which is a term that has a specific meaning) is around 5p per kWh. Electricity suppliers, including Pure Planet, charge around 15p per kWh.
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brackwell
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« Reply #21 on: August 19, 2019, 10:44:27 AM »

The energy cos have many more costs than the "wholesale price".

Leccy Cos do not make much profit% and some time make losses. Regardless, if it were possible to sell leccy that much cheaper do you not think they all would and have to, to stay in business, and do you not question why all the Cos that have tried it have gone bust.
Leccy Cos cannot get a unique selling factor as all leccy is the same and so there are no fat margins to cut.
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Pile-o-stone
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« Reply #22 on: August 19, 2019, 11:10:38 AM »

I guess they're just lying then. Oh well.

"Pure Planet customers pay no more than the firm pays for wholesale energy."
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nowty
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« Reply #23 on: August 19, 2019, 02:44:01 PM »

I guess they're just lying then. Oh well.

"Pure Planet customers pay no more than the firm pays for wholesale energy."

Your probably not paying more than the wholesale price that Pure Planet have paid, but its just that Pure Planet have failed to mention the other costs of network charges, levies and taxes.
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11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
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« Reply #24 on: August 19, 2019, 02:56:51 PM »

Go Octopus!
(with my referral code of course to get the free £50 credit) https://share.octopus.energy/teal-leaf-367
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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
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« Reply #25 on: August 19, 2019, 04:20:35 PM »

Why is so hard to find a tariff per kW from energy providers? It's infuriating. Octopus have the Octopus Go that charges 5p/kW between 0:30 and 4:30 am - that's great, but I can't find a rate for the rest of the time.

Found it:

Off-peak unit rate (00:30-04:30):

5.00 p / kWh

Peak unit rate (04:30-00:30):

14.63 p / kWh

Standing Charge:

25.00 p / day
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 04:23:05 PM by Home Farm » Logged

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« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2019, 04:34:01 PM »

Do I need a smart meter to be with Octopus?
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dan_b
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« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2019, 04:59:43 PM »

If you want these variable time of use tariffs then yes - but they will fit one for you, Octopus is rolling out SMETS2
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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
nowty
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« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2019, 05:04:45 PM »

There is also a Scottish Power EV tariff of 4.74p for 5 hours overnight.

But from what I have read, its nigh on impossible to actually move to it.
« Last Edit: August 19, 2019, 05:10:43 PM by nowty » Logged

11kW+ of PV installed and 56+ MWh generated.
Lithium battery storage of 50+ kWh.
Hot water storage of 15+ kWh.
Heat storage of 15+ kWh.
6kW Ground source heatpump.
EV BMW i3 (another 30+ kWh's of storage).
260,000+ litres of water harvested from underground river.
Home grown Fruit and Veg.
Ted
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« Reply #29 on: August 19, 2019, 06:59:21 PM »

I guess they're just lying then. Oh well.

"Pure Planet customers pay no more than the firm pays for wholesale energy."

From what I can find that quote is from a journalist and not from Pure Planet themselves.

No electricity supplier could sell electricity to homeowners at wholesale prices.  They have to cover all the other costs, such as distribution charges, as well.
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