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Author Topic: Wessex line signalling powered by PV.  (Read 300 times)
stannn
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« on: August 23, 2019, 07:11:47 AM »

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2019/aug/22/rail-line-in-hampshire-is-worlds-first-to-be-powered-by-solar-farm
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 07:22:01 AM by stannn » Logged

2.45 kWp PV (Navitron supply), 40 evacuated tubes (Navitron supply), Clearview 650 log burner with back-boiler heating cottage and water, 2 off 50W border collies, 1 off 35W cat, 1 off 25W cat.
oliver90owner
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« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2019, 07:45:30 AM »

What a load of useless hype!  Readers are paying this journalist and the publishers for this useless rubbish?

Perhaps these clowns should check out and pay off-gridders to find out how efficient (compared to the grid supply) off-grid systems can be.

Of course energy from or local star is free, if collected, and less polluting (best efficiency of generators using fossil fuel is only around 60%).

But 30kW of solar ain’t going to be used for any ‘traction’ I would suggest- particularly at night Smiley. So it needs energy storage as well (ask off-gridders?). What about winter? (ask off-gridders?).

As I see it the only real advantages are islanding from grid failures and possibly avoiding losing as much energy as ‘grid distribution losses’.  We have to hope that the solar farm does not have any supply issues ever - no system is failure proof - without adequate back up systems (that work!)

Now, will the trains just stop running if there were three consecutive days of foggy weather?  Or will they fit diesel generators to back up the solar system. Smiley

Carefully analysing her third paragraph would curl up the toes of anyone that can really understand what is written in that sentence.  It is clearly written in that way to appeal to the unknowing and witless Joe Public.

Just another waste of time effort and funding.

Just how many GW are required to run the whole railway system?  How many GWh are required on a typical busy day?  Somehow, I don’t envisage the whole rail system going off-grid in the foreseeable future!

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Nickel2
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« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2019, 07:58:21 AM »

Being at Aldershot, it will become ignored and overgrown until it goes wrong, then dismissed as unsuitable. The local idiots (of which Aldershot has an abundance) will not take very long to break what the caravan-utilising nomadic travellers do not steal. Principally a good idea; if it can survive Aldershot, it will survive anywhere.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 08:00:07 AM by Nickel2 » Logged

1.140kW mono south-facing at 49*
EpEver 4210A at 24v
Nearly dead 24V 400 Ah battery. (4x200Ah FLA)
EpEver STI1000-24-230 pure sine inverter
Of course it'll work. (It hasn't caught fire yet).
brackwell
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« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2019, 09:19:14 AM »

Going sideways (the article is rubbish) i have always wondered what are the losses associated with third rail operation particularly in high humidity and rain operation
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Nickel2
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« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2019, 12:03:34 PM »

Fixed losses are between 2.5% and 3.5%, area dependent. This is primarily transformer and insulator losses and depends on whether they are ceramic or polymer. Age, dirt and physical damage will also be variables in fixed losses. Variable losses are from juice-rail resistance and return path and averaged out at approximately 10%.
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1.140kW mono south-facing at 49*
EpEver 4210A at 24v
Nearly dead 24V 400 Ah battery. (4x200Ah FLA)
EpEver STI1000-24-230 pure sine inverter
Of course it'll work. (It hasn't caught fire yet).
Philip R
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« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2019, 10:51:53 AM »

Some time back whilst discussing uk railway energy use on the forum, I mentioned that network rail had signed a contract with edf for about 3TWh per annum for electricity. Whether for part or all the externally soured energy, I do not know. It equates to between 350-400MW average power.
Diesel consumption on uk railways was about 800 million litres on 2016.

Everytime network rail return a station, an effort should be made to collect solar energy, whether for traction, signalling, station utilitie, whatever. It aggregates as a net saving in fossil fuel use.
Most traction supplies derive from a traction substation,well away from the station. There are two, each end of Crewe.
I remember twice on a Crewe Euston trip, passing one near Bedford, with a 400kV grid connection.
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