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Author Topic: Fridge freezer repair help  (Read 3128 times)
daveluck_uk
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« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2020, 03:45:37 PM »

So I've found a little Kinvig shop. Tucked away down an alley in the old town. The old boy is coming out to have a look tomorrow morning.

If it is the compressor he can fit one for 270 - 300. Which I think sounds reasonable.

If it is a newer compressor does that mean that it is likely to be more efficient or is really only about the extra insulation on the modern fridge / freezers?





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biff
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« Reply #31 on: June 22, 2020, 06:34:30 PM »

Maybe a bit of both Dave,
      But the insulation is the big one. ( and of course a reliable compressor)
  Years ago, I converted a small chest freezer over to a fridge. It runs on very little electricity. It is a conversion that just takes about 3 minutes these days with the new types of stat that comes complete with plug and sensor on the end of a 4ft cable.  We have had this one running since 2008 and I an hoping to buy a new longer one in which I will  cut the lid in 3 sections. Make the end ones permanent and the centre one hinged , Then I will attach a full length of insulation to the hinged section. The food can then be stacked on either side of the center lid
     This is a project I promised myself  some years back and would like to do it before September.
         Biff
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Philip R
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« Reply #32 on: June 22, 2020, 06:55:18 PM »

Daveluck,
My last posting on ( (No19) The hash key not working on this laptop) suggested that you looked in your locale . Nice trying a bit more to get the fridge to work.

BTW how old is the fridge. I ask because our two fridges are 80s vintage, not the most efficient, but reliable. One was a Lec with a Necchi compressor (UK made) the wifes fridge, Candy with a Danfoss unit, both use the dreaded R11 ozone eater, but so long as they are gas tight then so be it.

Getting back to yours. Different fridges, different ratings and refridgerant charges. Different refrigerants run at different pressure ranges, so the compressor has to have a compression range or ratio which it works best for, Also the compressor lubricating oil must be compatible with the refridgerant gas used.
In essence, there are loads of replacement units out there, but they must be compatible. If an old refridgerant like R11 was used, they might offer a re-gas with something more modern and ozone friendly.
The price is fair imo.
Good luck,
Philip R
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daveluck_uk
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« Reply #33 on: June 22, 2020, 08:51:51 PM »

Maybe a bit of both Dave,
      But the insulation is the big one. ( and of course a reliable compressor)
  Years ago, I converted a small chest freezer over to a fridge. It runs on very little electricity. It is a conversion that just takes about 3 minutes these days with the new types of stat that comes complete with plug and sensor on the end of a 4ft cable.  We have had this one running since 2008 and I an hoping to buy a new longer one in which I will  cut the lid in 3 sections. Make the end ones permanent and the centre one hinged , Then I will attach a full length of insulation to the hinged section. The food can then be stacked on either side of the center lid
     This is a project I promised myself  some years back and would like to do it before September.
         Biff

Biff I really like this idea.

We have a long thin store room that I shelved out and we stack our jams and non  perishables in. But it isn't very cold and a bit humid so there are certain gjing we can't store in there.  I was considering insulating it and seeing if  I couldnt pick a a reasonablely priced refrigeration unit to drop the temp down to around 10-12c .but alas the prices are horrendous.

But...if I have a fairly large freezer that could sit at around that temperature then it might just do the job. Cooling a whole room does seem a bit excessive.

Hmmm...I wonder if I set up the freezer, drill a hole in the side, fit an inline fan controlled by a stat and once the freezer fridge is cold pump cool air into the storeroom to drop it a couple of degrees below ambient...I'd have to suck in air into the freezer fridge...more hmmmmmmming





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daveluck_uk
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« Reply #34 on: June 22, 2020, 09:05:20 PM »

Daveluck,
My last posting on ( (No19) The hash key not working on this laptop) suggested that you looked in your locale . Nice trying a bit more to get the fridge to work.

BTW how old is the fridge. I ask because our two fridges are 80s vintage, not the most efficient, but reliable. One was a Lec with a Necchi compressor (UK made) the wifes fridge, Candy with a Danfoss unit, both use the dreaded R11 ozone eater, but so long as they are gas tight then so be it.

Getting back to yours. Different fridges, different ratings and refridgerant charges. Different refrigerants run at different pressure ranges, so the compressor has to have a compression range or ratio which it works best for, Also the compressor lubricating oil must be compatible with the refridgerant gas used.
In essence, there are loads of replacement units out there, but they must be compatible. If an old refridgerant like R11 was used, they might offer a re-gas with something more modern and ozone friendly.
The price is fair imo.
Good luck,
Philip R


Ive lived here over 10 years and I've never seen a proper old fashioned repair shop for electrical goods ever!

I should of known there would be one. We are in Galicia and the people here, they never throw ANYTHING away.

I found it because I went back to the electrical place to see if they could supply the ptc. Nope, you need to go and talk to Raul.

Nice bloke, we had a good chat, he pulled out some freezers so I could point and explzani what was happening. I thought it was nice to see that he gave himself a jolt off a capacitor!  I even stuck a note above my capacitor to remind me to discharge it but still forgot.

So hopefully tomorrow I can update the thread with some goodish news.

The unit is from 2007/6. In 2009 I had to fix the original control board. There was a known problem with a relay and I think a capacitor. A guy on the internet did a kit and instructions for about 15.

So it has done well. But I really like it and so does the Mrs. Bizarre how you can get attached to a fridge freezer.

Most of the replacements we looked out were significantly smaller and the interior volume was a lot less as well.

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daveluck_uk
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« Reply #35 on: June 23, 2020, 04:38:29 PM »

Flipping Flowery Sunhats!!!!

They turned up, had a look, pulled all the connectors off, checked the windings, put them all on again and the thing sprung into life.

We waited and waited and it still worked

We unplugged it, gave it a few minutes...plugged it back in...in worked. The fing worked.

That'll be 30 thank you very much, call me if it packs up again....


Aaaarrrggggghhhh...

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daveluck_uk
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« Reply #36 on: July 03, 2020, 10:13:39 AM »

Firstly thanks for everybodies input. This has been quite an interesting learning curve.

OK. The freezer has now been running for a week.

I've been keeping an eye on the temperatures and I'm finding that every 12 hours there is a spike in the internal temps.

The freezer increases temp to about -10 or so then drops back down to -18. Meanwhile the compressor does kick in in-between times keeping the temps to more or less what I'd expect.

The spikes are so regular makes me wonder if there is some kind of duty cycle build in? Would that be right? ( pdf attached showing graph )


* freezer.pdf (178.84 KB - downloaded 17 times.)
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greentangerine
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« Reply #37 on: July 03, 2020, 11:55:24 AM »

I've been keeping an eye on the temperatures and I'm finding that every 12 hours there is a spike in the internal temps.

The freezer increases temp to about -10 or so then drops back down to -18. Meanwhile the compressor does kick in in-between times keeping the temps to more or less what I'd expect.

The spikes are so regular makes me wonder if there is some kind of duty cycle build in? Would that be right? ( pdf attached showing graph )

Defrost cycle for frost-free?
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biff
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« Reply #38 on: July 03, 2020, 12:58:42 PM »

Hi again Dave
       It looks like you have a delay of 8 degrees.
Which I suspect is a factory setting. Which gives the compressor a rest or time to cool.
This delay time was  programmable in my chest freezer to fridge conversion stat, the Early Bird. I could make that delay longer. The new stat on our Thermsl store protected the store from overheating and it also had a facility for adjusting the delay. It makes sense when you think about it. The old stat that was on the Thermal store previously,  had me fooled, sometimes it would work and sometimes it would not, but if I just tapped it with a pencil it would work. The new stat is brilliant.
   Long live stats with big clear digital info
       Biff
« Last Edit: July 03, 2020, 01:02:40 PM by biff » Logged

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daveluck_uk
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« Reply #39 on: July 03, 2020, 01:13:11 PM »


Both of those suggestions make sense. I'll keep my eye on it.



   Long live stats with big clear digital info
      

..and programmable hysterisis!😁

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