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Author Topic: Mazda MX-30 EV first drive  (Read 389 times)
dan_b
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« on: October 15, 2020, 12:26:26 PM »

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3nHDONip0SA&feature=youtu.be

Fully Charged check out the MX30 EV
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dan_b
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« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2020, 09:26:26 AM »

Surprised no comments here about the justification for the battery size in this BEV?
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« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2020, 10:34:17 AM »

My thoughts ..... I don't know. They seem to make a good argument, or is it just because they can't get enough batts, and cheap enough? What ever the reason I think more BEV's with more choice and different pricing, should help the market expand.

The Dacia (Renault) Sprint offers very budget BEV'ing, so that's another option too.
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Just call me Mart.     Cardiff: 5.58kWp PV - (3.58kWp SE3500 + 2kWp SE2200 WNW)
oliver90owner
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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2020, 10:49:57 AM »

My thoughts on battery size is that ideally it should never (or rarely) be charged above 80% and not discharged below 20% SOC - and not recharged at the very highest rate possible all of the time.

An accepted ideal for maximum battery life.  Trouble is that leased cars, returned after 3 years, have quite likely been regularly charged (on rapid chargers) from a low SOC to close to 100% because the users (they are not owners of the vehicle) donít know or donít care a jot about battery care.
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Philip R
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« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2020, 11:18:37 AM »

Is that not the same for company cars, hire cars etc, of the ICE variety, drivers sat at the lights, foot on the brake and on the clutch, or holding a car stationary on a gradient on the clutch and not using the handbrake and putting into neutral. (not for automatic transmission).

« Last Edit: October 23, 2020, 11:45:01 AM by Philip R » Logged
kdmnx
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« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2020, 01:28:40 PM »

Lots of people never drive more than 100 miles in a day. Why pay for, and lug around, a 300-mile battery when you rarely do more than 20-30 miles?

The only real downside for the owners of these vehicles is that you really can't use it for the annual trip to Cornwall, or to visit relatives, etc.. However if you have another car for that (300-mile BEV/Hybrid/or ICE) then one of these is a perfect runaround.

I think the niche for 100-mile BEVs will continue to exist (just get cheaper) even as technology progresses.
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« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2020, 02:21:12 PM »

PV. That changes things a bit.

Having a bigger battery means you can make better use of generation, such as not charging when you are low but due to the larger battery have enough to tide you over, as the forecast for tomorrow (for example) is good. I was also able to move ~60kWh of September sunshine into October driving.

This doesn't mean big batts are the right answer, just that they allow for some interesting side issues. And a big batt on a BEV with V2G/H would be a very useful thing. And on that note, a strange idea I may have posted before regarding off grid living - I wonder if a BEV could be used to replace the need for a back up gennie if a fast charger was within a reasonable distance?
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dan_b
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« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2020, 02:53:01 PM »

The justification given for the small battery size in this SUV is a bit weird if you ask me and I'm not sure I believe it.

They're saying that they deliberately went for a relatively small battery (compared to the size of the actual vehicle) because of the embedded energy/carbon cost of manufacturing the battery - they claim if they put a bigger battery in there, it would have taken much longer for it to reach carbon-equivalence with its petrol/diesel-powered cousins.

I'm not sure I buy that.  I doubt their carbon consumption figures for the ICE versions include the energy required to extract, refine and transport the fuel in the first place.  And secondly, by building a car with a deliberately limited range means it's likely to only ever be a "2nd car" and so doesn't displace as many ICE powered journeys as it could if it were a bigger range vehicle?  I also think it's bunkum when you compare the price of this vehicle and its capacity vs other BEVs.

So, I think it's a bit of post-rationalisation for a choice that was probably taken by accountants in Mazda who don't want it to be "too" successful that it steals sales from their own ICE cars, and also to cover up the fact that they've probably got a really, really, bad supply deal for batteries in general - they can't get them at scale, and they're paying through the nose for them because all the other battery manufacturers are already pumping out every cell they can make?



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3.06kWp SolarEdge system with a split array:
2.18kWp 10x South facing, plus 4x West facing 880W

Mk1 ImmerSUN DHW diverter
4kW PowerVault Battery

Tesla Model 3 Long Range
kdmnx
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« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2020, 03:13:46 PM »

PV. That changes things a bit.

Having a bigger battery means you can make better use of generation, such as not charging when you are low but due to the larger battery have enough to tide you over, as the forecast for tomorrow (for example) is good. I was also able to move ~60kWh of September sunshine into October driving.

This doesn't mean big batts are the right answer, just that they allow for some interesting side issues. And a big batt on a BEV with V2G/H would be a very useful thing. And on that note, a strange idea I may have posted before regarding off grid living - I wonder if a BEV could be used to replace the need for a back up gennie if a fast charger was within a reasonable distance?

Those are all valid points. Octopus Agile similar, eg if there is a multi-hour super-low/negative "event" then you can fill your boots. Whether that makes sense paying for, and lugging around, a huuuuge battery you don't otherwise need is up for debate.

I was imagining last night buying 2x V2G Leafs, leaving one in Tesco carpark connected to the free 7kW charger, swapping them over every day, and never paying for a drop of electricity again. I'm sure it'll take a while to pay off the cost of the cars (although the cost of only one could be attributable to this project) and Tesco'd probably notice pretty soon and come up with a "fair use" policy to thwart me...
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12x JA Solar 340Wp panels (total 4080Wp)
Lux Power inverter charger
5x PylonTech 2000 2.4kWh batteries (total 12kWh (11kWh usable))
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