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Author Topic: The new wood.  (Read 1095 times)
AndrewE
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« Reply #30 on: January 11, 2021, 09:14:28 AM »

Farmers are already moving back to this with corners of fields that cannot be planted by large machinery planted up with trees then connecting hedgerows of hawthorn and blackthorn with specimen trees planted to produce wildlife corridors. My own farm the trees had been planted to provide shelter belts and a continuing income from log production from coppiced trees. Unfortunately the large proportion of Ash planted are all dead due to ash dieback and the hazel has been disappointing due to the high deer population. Little plastic tubes do not protect hazel from deer. 
I read "Wilding" (by Isabells Tree) recently and learnt a lot, despite a lifetime's interest in the subject.

In this context, that "the thorn is the nursery of the oak" or something to that effect, and that thorn scrub was actually protected on common land centuries ago because it protected seedlings that would otherwise have got eaten.  It also provides refuge and shelter for small birds and other animals.  Hence our obsession with removing it and tidying up hedges and plantations is completely misguided.

I would urge anyone with any land or interest in wildlife to read the book!
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billi
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« Reply #31 on: January 11, 2021, 10:30:28 AM »

 lovefirefox
A thought: was advised once that fresh chippings generally not a good idea - the composting process draws something from the soil... canít remember what. Mats of any sort better to cut weed/grass competition, but keeping them in place troublesome..

Chas

Well , wood chippings are not too bad  in relation of what you mean , but bark definitely needs  thinking about  the nitrogen  , that is  used from the ground while it composts over the years ... , so i learnt  to  to ad some N feritilizer  to the plants before  covering the ground with bark mulch ,  we used horn chippings , cause they take a while to be  broken down by  organism in the ground  and changed to a form of Nitrogen , that a plant root can absorb , we avoided  industrial or artificial  N-based  fertilizers  that are instantly  available for the plant , but did not fit the purpose of tree planting cause the plants need to develop roots first ....  so   for ecological reasons and  economic reasons  it did not make sense in winter times with lots of rain  or snow to  get those  fertilizers washed away  somewhere-else , before the plant can access  -  wood chips  can be slightly different , if they include some "green" stuff  cause the lively  part of a stem or trunk or branch is between the bark and the wood  and in that very thin layer , the living cells  contain  the food (fertilizer)

But sure  as well , it all depends on the  soil , but mulching in general is a good one , funny enough  i convinced  a few clients  to use  the grass clippings from their lawn ( if cut regular and no seeds involved)  to sped it over the planting beds ,  sofar,  very good results on established  beds ,
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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
renewablejohn
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« Reply #32 on: January 11, 2021, 12:43:02 PM »

Farmers are already moving back to this with corners of fields that cannot be planted by large machinery planted up with trees then connecting hedgerows of hawthorn and blackthorn with specimen trees planted to produce wildlife corridors. My own farm the trees had been planted to provide shelter belts and a continuing income from log production from coppiced trees. Unfortunately the large proportion of Ash planted are all dead due to ash dieback and the hazel has been disappointing due to the high deer population. Little plastic tubes do not protect hazel from deer. 

Sorry to hear your ash trees died. I am interested to know what the biodegradable non plastic deer protector is? Its good to increase info, thanks.

Not biodegradable but reuseable for protection of hazel I have needed to use IBC container frames in some cases stacked two high so that the deer do not take out the leader. IBC cage split in half with angle grinder then reconnected with hose pipe and jubilee clips top and bottom.
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renewablejohn
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« Reply #33 on: January 11, 2021, 12:48:24 PM »


Would rather have seen him direct drilling in such soil conditions to stop wind blow rather than using a plough.
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AndrewE
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« Reply #34 on: January 11, 2021, 01:59:23 PM »

I have now found the main reference in "Wilding", but there is lots more: the index lists 20 pages for just "scrub" and 24 for "thorny scrub" although there is obiously some overlap, but surprisingly little.
I like the idea of using IBC cages.
A


* Scrub (2).jpg (335.9 KB, 613x1070 - viewed 74 times.)
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AndrewE
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« Reply #35 on: January 11, 2021, 01:59:59 PM »

and the next page


* Scrub (3).jpg (341.77 KB, 624x1055 - viewed 74 times.)
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billi
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« Reply #36 on: January 11, 2021, 03:57:40 PM »


Would rather have seen him direct drilling in such soil conditions to stop wind blow rather than using a plough.

True  John  i am not a big supporter  of  ploughing myself , for several reasons

But  , there is a lot to said about methods  of planting bare-root  plants , i read a research  a few years ago about an Irish  forrest ( mainly larch and spruce i suppose) , that got hammered by a storm and  many acres of  woodland just  fell ,   they investigated about it , why this particular forrest got mor damaged then the  near by one , the result was , that the trees have been planted wrong a few decades back ,   and  the planting cut into the ground was just too small, the roots stuffed in , in a fast way  , so they bended upwards in the plant-hole ,  instead of creating a deeper anchor .... it also  depends on the soil , if one has a clayey  topsoil ground and  make a plant-hole with a spade ,   on creates like a growing container by sealing the structure of the soil  at the walls of the hole ,

anyway , we might have to start a new thread of how to plant ....  garden
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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
gravyminer
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« Reply #37 on: January 11, 2021, 11:49:01 PM »

Good discussion
Thank you all.

I planted several hundred mixed broadleaves on around 4 acres of steep ground that we let a handful of pigs run wild on for a couple of years.
They removed all the bramble and wildflowers and spread the gorse to every corner.  banghead
As I watched the trees attempt to get ahead of the gorse, I noticed how those that were in clearer areas got tidied down to the top of the tree tube by the local deer but all this seemed to do was to make the tree grow more vigourously within the tube and eventually race ahead of the grazers.
I toyed with the idea of fitting a flail head on an old 3 tonne tracked Kubota to beat the gorse back but reality got in the way and the flail head never materialised.  25 years on and the trees have totally suppressed the gorse with a canopy fully forming. Tracks have evolved through the trees that kids rode their motorbikes or horses around and are now pleasant walkways. We failed to remove the tree tubes and were scolded by experts for this but they eventually split and were collected and eerrr disposed of. You can still tell its a plantation because the trees are all similar in size although the survivors  have self selected.  We planted in groups of 10 all the same species and 3 paces apart, taking care not to create regimented lines / columns. I guess we will eventually be able to convince ourselves its a natural woodland and it does now feel like woodland rather than the scrubland we took on in the early 80's

Hopefully next year I will be planting more trees, this time on around 3 acres of contaminated mine land on the edge of Dartmoor. I know which trees to plant because the pioneers are already slowly recolonising the land so am really only, at best, accelerating natural regeneration. Pockets of uncontaminated soil and nutrients are all I can offer the saplings but I do like the look of these non plastic degradable  tubes -
http://ezeetrees.com/#tree-guards
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gravyminer
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