navitron
 
Renewable Energy and Sustainability Forum
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Anyone wishing to register as a new member on the forum is strongly recommended to use a "proper" email address. Following continuous spam/hack attempts on the forum, "disposable" email addresses like Gmail, Yahoo and Hotmail tend to be viewed with suspicion, and the application rejected if there is any doubt whatsoever
 
Recent Articles: Navitron Partners With Solax to Help Create A More Sustainable Future | Navitron Calls for Increased Carbon Footprint Reduction In Light of Earth Overshoot Day | A plea from The David School - Issue 18
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Adding antifreeze to solar system  (Read 441 times)
Hugo
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



« on: February 13, 2021, 12:06:44 PM »


Long time since I posted last.
I have a 30 tube solar system from Navitron that I installed in September 2008.
I have been lax of late and haven't been keeping an eye on the pressure, I checked yesterday and there was no pressure whatsoever.
The trouble is I disposed of my old Hozelock garden sprayer because it got damaged, I have a different brand one now from Draper but I'm unsure how to connect it to the filling loop.
I believe there is some form of brass connector that is used that fits onto the sprayer lance.
If anybody could point me in the right direction where I could purchase one I'd be much obliged.
Logged
Antman
Global Moderator
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2073


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 13, 2021, 05:58:51 PM »

Hi Hugo
Depends on what sprayer you have. Mine used a 3/8" bsp to 15mm compression adaptor (with the nut and olive removed) from BES but all depends on the thread on your lance/hose end.
Antman
Logged

20 x 47mm, 172 l cylinder, Heat Dump, 15 x Sanyo HIT-H250E, SB4000TL,  Nestor Martin IQ13 WBS
DIY Solar System Support at http://www.handyantman.co.uk/antman.html
All support is voluntary and free of charge. I'm not employed by Navitron so responses may not be same-day
ecogeorge
Hero Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1481

Forest of Dean -Gloucestershire


« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2021, 06:48:18 PM »

Have never used antifreeze in solar tubes ,-just enable  a setting in the controller that turns the pump on if collector temp less than 5c.....they are well insulated ......
George
Logged
Hugo
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 291



« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2021, 09:41:44 PM »

Thanks for the replies.
Antman I believe you have stated what I am after.
I'll go look for one tomorrow.
I bet somewhere in my workshop my old one is hiding, it's a mess so I couldn't find it.
Ecogeorge I do have the controller set for the frost setting at the moment, trouble is it takes a lot of heat away from the stored water as it constantly comes on.
Logged
AndrewE
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 427


« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2021, 11:48:38 PM »

Have never used antifreeze in solar tubes ,-just enable  a setting in the controller that turns the pump on if collector temp less than 5c.....they are well insulated ......
George
However, given that my solar tube manifold was showing minus four point something the other morning I'm very glad that the system wasn't busy importing that much cold into the bottom of my cylinder.  Especially as no insulation is perfect and it would have been chilling the bottom of my tank right down and attracting condensation in the house.
Maybe it would only take a minute or two's running to take the chill off the manifold, but it still seems wrong to me.  A bit like the people who (apparently) leave taps running to stop waste pipes freezing up.  I just make sure that there is no continuous trickle to freeze up in the first place.
(So my planned MVHR system condensate drain into the bathroom waste might need a re-think now!  Grrr!)
A
Logged
pj
Sr. Member
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 352

Nom de Plume


« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2021, 04:08:51 PM »

Have never used antifreeze in solar tubes ,-just enable  a setting in the controller that turns the pump on if collector temp less than 5c.....they are well insulated ......
George
However, given that my solar tube manifold was showing minus four point something the other morning I'm very glad that the system wasn't busy importing that much cold into the bottom of my cylinder.  Especially as no insulation is perfect and it would have been chilling the bottom of my tank right down and attracting condensation in the house.
Maybe it would only take a minute or two's running to take the chill off the manifold, but it still seems wrong to me.  A bit like the people who (apparently) leave taps running to stop waste pipes freezing up.  I just make sure that there is no continuous trickle to freeze up in the first place.
(So my planned MVHR system condensate drain into the bathroom waste might need a re-think now!  Grrr!)
A
I also use the low temperature setting on the controller - it's been working fine for over 15 years now. Never had a problem with condensation - it's only 2 or three litres of cold water in the manifold, and mixes back into the tank no problem. Heat loss from the manifold is only about 5W/degC temp difference, so the overall loss is minimal, and usually compensated by the bright sunshine next day. It's definitely not like leaving a dripping tap - it's totally controlled, and only sends enough hot water to keep it above my setting of 4degC.
Logged

North Hampshire
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
Simple Audio Video Embedder
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!