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Author Topic: flywheel bike  (Read 8945 times)
billi
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« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2008, 08:27:10 PM »

I think or heared ( is there a difference ? banghead)

these are in the flywheel buisness ..... but perhaps its cheaper to go for a PV charged battery  Tongue

http://www.beaconpower.com/

billi
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1.6 kw and 2.4 kw   PV array  , Outback MX 60 and FM80 charge controller  ,24 volt 1600 AH Battery ,6 Kw Victron inverter charger, 1.1 kw high head hydro turbine as a back up generator , 5 kw woodburner, 36 solar tubes with 360 l water tank, 1.6 kw  windturbine
Gnidrolog
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« Reply #16 on: May 19, 2008, 08:29:42 PM »

Some years ago there were experiments with a flywheel tram. The motor made electrical contact at stops to charge while the passengers got on. What I thought was very clever was the gear arrangement. Power output from the flywheel was taken from the centre at pull away, then the drivers lever pulled the output jockey wheel towards the edge to increase speed (CVT?). To slow down the lever pushed the jockey wheel towards the flywheel centre to put the trams inertia back into the flywheel. The flywheel was horizontal so it aided stability on cornering.

I think the experiment took place in Barking, probably 15 years or more ago. Presumably it failed as I've heard no more about it.

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« Reply #17 on: May 20, 2008, 12:45:50 AM »

but perhaps its cheaper to go for a PV charged battery  Tongue

billi

Here's a link to a PV bike 900 Kilometer race, average speed 40Km/H. 150W motor. That's if I understand it fully http://www.flighttechdistribution.co.uk/News/open_article.asp?articleNo=456&parent=technical

Gnidrolog
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renewablejohn
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« Reply #18 on: May 20, 2008, 09:28:23 AM »

You could use the rear motor bike tyre  as the compressed air cylinder and the technology to inflate and deflate tyres on the move as your powerline. link this with a screw compressor which can be used as a motor and you have an air powered bike.
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Ivan
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« Reply #19 on: May 20, 2008, 01:17:45 PM »

Flywheel-powered buses are very real. Used in Switzerland:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gyrobus
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KenB
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« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2008, 03:26:52 PM »

Ivan, List,

Correction,it was the Lawrence Livermore Labs that did the research in the mid-1990s using a bank of very high speed composite flywheels as power storage.

The flywheels incorporated rare earth magnets to get the power in and out and were run on air bearings, with the flywheel in an evacuated vessel IIRC.  Turn around efficiency (energy out / energy in ) was stated as 99% compared to about 65% for a lead acid battery.

I found this Livermore paper for some of the details, but I think the original article that got me interested was in the Scientific American October 1997.


http://www.osti.gov/bridge/servlets/purl/358801-vtzl8B/webviewable/358801.pdf


 Flywheels in Hybrid Vehicles; October 1997; Scientific American Magazine; by Rosen, Castleman; 3 Page(s)

The search for an alternative to the internal-combustion engine used in today¿s cars is motivated by two societal concerns: the need to reduce fossil-fuel consumption and the need to reduce air pollution. Unfortunately, most car buyers do not make their purchases based on these criteria. Instead, when looking for a new automobile, most consumers consider issues such as cost, safety, performance and fuel efficiency. (This last factor does, of course, have an effect on fuel consumption and pollution, but it is rarely a car buyer¿s primary concern.)

In 1993 one of us (Rosen), along with his brother, Benjamin, founded Rosen Motors with the goal of producing a new type of powertrain for cars that would not only address concerns about pollution and fuel efficiency but would also be something that consumers would actually want to own.

http://www.sciamdigital.com/index.cfm?fa=Products.ViewIssuePreview&ISSUEID_CHAR=55FFD523-BFC2-4006-87AB-B49A4B9B4A1&ARTICLEID_CHAR=40A5048D-1AE0-4AED-B8B7-1472C964FBE
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KenB
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« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2008, 03:50:59 PM »

Ivan, List,


After some hunting - Here is the link to the electro-mechanical battery EMB - developed by the Livermore Labs

https://www.llnl.gov/str/pdfs/04_96.2.pdf



Ken
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mespilus
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« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2008, 04:23:23 PM »

Were ever/are any embs commercially available?
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« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2008, 04:48:18 PM »

List,

EMBs failed to get out of the lab.

Whilst the rose tinted spectacled scientists referered to their failure mode as "benign" - there is nothing benign about 1kWh of flywheel dissipating that energy in under a second, when the bearings failed.   TNT has a lower energy density than the flwheels used in the EMB.  whistlie

Ken
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Ivan
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« Reply #24 on: May 21, 2008, 01:33:23 AM »

The link that Billi mentioned - Beacon Power are producing 25kWh/100kWh units!! I haven't dared to ask a price, though.

I did speak to an American company a few years ago that was developing home-scale 25kWh units, to be burried in a hole in the basement. The idea was that if the flywheel failed, the impact would be absorbed by surrounding earth. Seemed sensible to me. They were planning to produce their machines for a few thousand dollars, but I can't find them, now
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