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Author Topic: can i use my stream?  (Read 3082 times)
dbass999
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« on: June 09, 2006, 10:47:04 AM »

Iím wondering if anyone can give me advice about using my stream with the Navitron 9kw heat pump.
I have 50m of fast flowing all year round, 10ft wide by 1 ft minimum depth stream very near my house.
Can anyone help me calculate if this is a possibility, and how many runs up and down the stream would be the most efficient?
I intend to use it to heat a part renovation/barn conversion 3 bedroom house (maily with very good insulation), with newly laid underfloor heating throughout.
Also, do I need to ask the Riverways authority (or whoever) for permission to do this?
Thanks in advance
James
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Ivan
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« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2006, 02:08:17 AM »

Hi James,

Yes, you can use your stream. The calculation I use is 30W per metre in the ground, although 40W is probably ok in most cases. In the stream, it would probably be less, but I don't know by how much. You cannot do any harm by having more than enough,though.

Another alternative would be to use the stream water direct through the heatpump. This can work ok, but you will need a filter on the suction end, to avoid sucking up fish, frogs, dirt and twigs etc into the heatpump. By running the water directly, it will increase efficiency a little.

The Environment Agency is in charge of rivers. If you read their literature, you need to fill in a request form to go paddling in the water. I cannot see that running some pipes up and down are going to cause any harm. If you are pumping the water directly, you would NOT require an abstraction licence, but I think they recommend applying for exemption....with a small fee attached.

By the way, have you measured up for a water turbine?!

Ivan
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dbass999
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« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2006, 04:40:52 PM »

Thanks for this, I'm very tempted to go this route.
One more quiestion, sorry if its answered elswhere.
I'm going to put in a seperate heat store for the HeatPump system. What is the optimum size? I'm guessing that obove a certain size no more effeciancy is gained.
thanks
james
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Ivan
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« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2006, 12:30:06 AM »

I think generally the buffer tanks for heatpumps are around 120-200litres, but I do not know what the optimum would be.

Ivan
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