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Author Topic: 110ah deep cycle battery (wet lead acid)  (Read 11590 times)
WeeVic
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« on: December 13, 2008, 03:27:29 PM »

I`m thinking of getting some new batteries to add to my solar power setup!

So far I`m using a 55watt panel to charge a 110ah battery. I have two setups like this and they seem to work fine with controllers attached.


Basically on friday I have purchased a massive 110watt panel from Navitron!! And was wondering what would be the best way to charge batteries with it?

Should i got for two new batteries of the same make in parallel?  (2X 12 volt 110ah)

What`s the maximum charge you reccomend for charing a 110ah battery without damaging it with too much current?

Thanks for any advice!!

I do use charge controllers,but also need to know the maximum allowed current charge per battery so i dont fry them man!! LOL

 bike


Seriously dont want to put excessive charge to any of the batteries so that they last longer.

 
« Last Edit: December 13, 2008, 03:29:20 PM by WeeVic » Logged

My system is much smaller now due to a house sale recently, but I`ll be building something again soon at my new place...

I use a lot of Freeplay Energy stuff and have a 200W solar setup into 2volt cells just in case there is a power cut! And there has been too many too often...
johnrae
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« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2008, 11:20:50 PM »

C/7 is a usual "healthy" upper rate of charge, which works out at around 17 amps for a 110AH battery
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martin
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« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2008, 11:31:50 PM »

If in doubt, the "10% for everything" rule of thumb is fairly safe and accurate - aim to -
Charge at no more than 10% of a battery's capacity - 110amp/hr battery, 11 amps - (roughly 130 watts)
Discharge at no more than 10% of it's capacity - 110 amp/hr battery, max discharge rate - 11 amps (130 watts)
Take no more than 10% of it's capacity per day (if you do the sums, it's usually a safe rule of thumb to ensure longevity of your batteries) Wink
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Amy
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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2008, 12:13:32 AM »

I thought it was wise to fully discharge a battery and then fully charge rather than keep topping up all the time?
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martin
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« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2008, 12:27:52 AM »

noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo! horror
There's many batteries that you'll literally kill stone dead if you flatten them right out! About the only ones in common use that you can "flatten" with relative impunity are NiCads, but they are seldom used in renewables (they have other drawbacks) Shocked
Some of the cheaper "leisure batteries" may literally be irrecoverable from a "completely flat" condition - never, ever discharge them deeply........ faint
I'll repeat it  - the better batteries quote figures like "200 cycles to 50% DOD*" which means that if you take 50% of the charge, the battery will probably last 200 cycles (and roughly pro rata - the same batteries should last for 1,000 cycles if discharged to 10%) - Generally the percentage quoted is usually the same percentage below which you are advised not to take it. These are typical figures for an "el cheapo" leisure battery - if you cycle them once a day to 50% they'll last just over 6 months, to 10% nearly 3 years.......... Wink

*Depth of Discharge
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Stefan (S.T.E.F.)
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« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2009, 09:54:58 AM »

I thought it was wise to fully discharge a battery and then fully charge rather than keep topping up all the time?

That was NiCd cells if I remember correctly. Had something to do with memory effect.
However, the batteries you use for storing alternative energy do not come under that. The 10% rule as Martin said should be applied instead.

Stefan
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WeeVic
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« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2010, 08:17:00 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_battery_types
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My system is much smaller now due to a house sale recently, but I`ll be building something again soon at my new place...

I use a lot of Freeplay Energy stuff and have a 200W solar setup into 2volt cells just in case there is a power cut! And there has been too many too often...
Philip R
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« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2010, 09:59:02 PM »

Agree with Martin, just adding a little more.

Amy, deep discharging lead acid will sulphate the plates, clogging up their active surface,(killing them), attempting recharge is seldom successful.

When you say wet lead acid, do you mean Plante type; pasted plate (lead alloy lattice grid with spongy lead pressed in) and solid formed lead positive plates.
Or Faure type; positive and negative lattice grid plates with active materials pressed in ( similar to car battery).

Charging regimes vary according to controller/ battery design basis,so follow manufacturers recommendations, also buy yourself a good digital voltmeter.

However, the following is true for industrial plante battery operation.
When boost charging,(This bring cells up and hopefully balances the cell charge as they are all gently overcharged) C7 as Johnrae says is OK, depends on charger size and cost, however, at 2.30 volts per cell, you will see the onset of gassing, drop the charge rate to C14 (half C7 current). The volts per cell will drop back but then climb again as charge increases. Gassing knocks plate material out the plate and a sludge builds up in the mud space at the bottom of the cells, thus shortening  cell life if overcharging continues too long. ( I recall commissioning a new battery, the cells raised to 2.65 Volts per cell at C30 for a short period to balance the cell voltages and SGs prior to resting before the initially discharge test. However, maintaining too high a charge rate cooks the cells, evaporating the electrolyte, & stated earlier, knocking material out the cells (Manufacturers recommendations, but not too often)).

Float charging then maintains cells at around 2.25 volts per cell, as the cell is discharged, the cell voltage will drop to just above 2.00 to 2.06 volts per cell, but then could be recharged at C1 up to 2.25 volts per cell. ( How large capacity Plante battery banks are operated in places like power stations etc and they can last typically 20 -25 years).

With a solar application, the charge voltage ceiling regime will operate typically between these two regimes, but the current should not exceed C7, unless using auxilliary charger.

Mixing cells in series can be problematic as cells do not balance until the plates have been conditioned by use. It is typical for the cell resistance to fall and the AH capacity to rise for say a year and then trend the other way as the plates deteriorate.
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biff
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« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2010, 11:42:31 PM »

amy,,,,,,!!!!!
              how could you,,""" !!!! how could you possibly think that???
                                     biff
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An unpaid Navitron volunteer,who has been living off-grid,powered by wind and solar,each year better than the last one.
EccentricAnomaly
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« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2010, 11:16:41 AM »

Maybe she's learned something in the last two years.  Something of a zombie thread, don't you think?
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