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Author Topic: How much wooodland do I need?  (Read 21694 times)
Justme
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« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2009, 03:10:59 PM »

yeh I had heard numbers like 1000 per day. Air spades are good too.

Justme
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charlieb
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« Reply #16 on: February 24, 2009, 04:23:45 PM »

Do these transplanted trees really do OK?    Many of the (slighly smaller) ones I've transplanted by hand, especially beech, have ended up dieing.   I've also heard that you're as well transplanting really small stuff - it takes the big ones a couple of years to recover from the moving shock, so the littluns will have caught up by then anyway.   Experience?  Thoughts?    (Not that I'm going to go spend  a grand hiring one of these PTO spades). 

C
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dhaslam
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« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2009, 04:37:45 PM »

Small trees can survive easily because the roots are contained within the clay plug lifted  by the spade.   Larger trees have their roots cut and it is recommended that they be partly cut for a full year before moving.  This encourages the tree to form new shorter roots.   The loss of root area can be compensated for by constant watering,   The easiest way is too use a barrel of water and arrange to have a constant drip.   In any case it is easier to move trees when they are dormant.     There is a danger with global warming that a lot of shallow rooted trees like beech will start dying  even without moving them  so it isn't surprising that there are a lot of failures.   
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billt
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« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2009, 05:30:28 PM »

The best way of getting lots of trees is to plant whips. They cost about 25p each for common native species, are dead easy to plant (only need a hand spade) and establish really well. You have to plant them when they are dormant, and they'll need protection if you have rabbits or deer.

Transplanting trees is only for those with loads of money who want an instant feature!
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billi
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« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2009, 07:39:02 PM »

I planted about 3000  willow ,Alder , Poplar (Aspen)  for a coppice woodland idea  for later fire wood

The  bare rooted willow i bought for  less then 50 pence a plant   and cut it into about 4 cuttings that i just sticked in the ground (at least  4 to10 inch )

This winter i took further cuttings to increase the density

Thats the result after one and a half year   

Billi


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StBarnabas
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« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2009, 08:33:40 PM »

Billi
Poplar is an interesting choice it has a bad press. Possibly Aspen is better? Ash and Willow I can understand; indeed they are part of the greening plan for StBC.
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Taffyboy
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« Reply #21 on: February 24, 2009, 08:48:17 PM »

I have access to a 10 acre, 40 yr old woodland here, have someone from the Oxfordshire Woodland Trust visiting on Monday to give free advice, should be good!
In the meantime I'm felling standing seasoned beech like no tomorrow.... Grin

Lurvely and warm here...
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Treebeard
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« Reply #22 on: February 24, 2009, 08:48:56 PM »

Poplar is fine as firewood, it seasons quite quickly if it is cut to log lengths. It burns quite quickly though, great for an instant burst of heat.
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billi
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« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2009, 09:22:55 PM »

Quote
Billi
Poplar is an interesting choice it has a bad press. Possibly Aspen is better? Ash and Willow I can understand; indeed they are part of the greening plan for StBC.

The Plan was and is to use fast growing  wood and straight , so minimal work involved  and then cut the straight  shoots into 1 meter long bundled with a hemp line  , fed into a  wood gasifying boiler ( similar sized  like a square  straw bale )  in one  piece   ( perhaps too heavy , will see,  hope the forklift battery will help   Grin)

Or shredder it and use a wood chip burner .... I am a bid mad about it, to reduce my manual work compared to the gain ... arent we all a bit lazy ?


Billi
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daftlad
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« Reply #24 on: February 24, 2009, 11:02:55 PM »

billi
I am sure i have said this before but a simple gasifying heater is a ceramic/ russian/ masonary stove.
two burns a day and it acts as a big thermal store, the wood you feed it with should be pretty thin as well so coppice ideal.
you need the space for it though.

laters
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I WILL KEEP BANGING ON ABOUT MASONRY STOVES
billi
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« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2009, 11:29:32 PM »

daftlad

I like these masonry stoves , but doubt Russia  is the  origin (might be wrong )

Ours in Bavaria was built and about  10 ton heavy  ( i guess) and its a nice memory for me (was 14  to 22 years of age)

It worked 100 % hot and was a cool  setup , but now i am in Ireland  Grin  so no heavy winter and only need  heat in small doses ....  and like to mix solar heating and wood ... so i guess has to be a thermal store


Sure i still think about an Idea to utilize  a masonry stove  to combine with a solar Air heating Idea ( just to pass on the Warm air of the panels through the long winding clay  chimney   in the stove )  and have the let me say 10 ton heavy clay block as a huge radiator

Next live i will be an Inventor  Grin

Billi
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daftlad
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« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2009, 11:46:27 PM »

Billi
I don't think they originated in russia but they certainly use the concept well.
I think they could be combined with passive solar very well but not so good combined with other solar (not enough heat) but i may be wrong.
the reason i bang on about ceramic stoves is they are simple and efficient 90 percent as opposed to 75 in a metal wood stove or less and will burn any old rubbish.

laters
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I WILL KEEP BANGING ON ABOUT MASONRY STOVES
billi
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« Reply #27 on: February 24, 2009, 11:53:26 PM »

daftlad

totally  agree with you they outperform most(all)  metal stoves  easy

Billi
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Taffyboy
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« Reply #28 on: February 25, 2009, 02:10:08 AM »

Unless you want to boil your whites in them..
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Vermont Castings Vigilant with a 10 acre woodland...Cheap heat doesn't get better...

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daftlad
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« Reply #29 on: February 25, 2009, 02:21:28 AM »

I have seen masonry stoves with hotplates and an oven
laters
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I WILL KEEP BANGING ON ABOUT MASONRY STOVES
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