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Author Topic: How much wooodland do I need?  (Read 21557 times)
Taffyboy
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« Reply #45 on: March 01, 2009, 11:56:32 PM »

Interesting that English Heritage, when replanting, refuse to use Beech in southern counties as global warming, they predict, will wipe out a lot of the beech down 'ere because they are so shallow rooted..
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Vermont Castings Vigilant with a 10 acre woodland...Cheap heat doesn't get better...

If it flies, floats or fornicates, rent it.
charlieb
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« Reply #46 on: March 02, 2009, 01:36:14 PM »

Alba trees is my local (SE Scotland), and highly recommended for cell grown so you can plant any time of year (I have planted mid summer with pretty good results).   http://www.albatrees.co.uk/   They do an internet thing through the woodland Trust, so the markup from local prices is at least going to a good cause.  http://www.native-tree-shop.com/ .  Though looking at the prices just now you're MUCH better off buying direct from Alba.
C
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kristen
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« Reply #47 on: March 08, 2009, 08:11:42 PM »

Sorry for late reply. I have used, and would recommend, Ashridge Trees. But too late now for bare root until November 2009 - I think?
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Brandon
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« Reply #48 on: March 08, 2009, 08:37:40 PM »

daft lad I do hope that this was a slip of he finger!!

"wall dimension of 25" x 25' x 6 feet high."
« Last Edit: March 08, 2009, 08:39:36 PM by Brandon » Logged

changing the world, one roof at a time.

Quality is never an accident; It is always the result of
high intention, sincere effort, intelligent direction, and
skilful execution; It represents the wise choice of many
alternatives.
daftlad
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« Reply #49 on: March 08, 2009, 08:55:30 PM »

Not my typing (copy and paste) but no excuse. it would be a funny looking stove with those dimensions or maybe it isn't a stove at all, sounds more like a wall?
I have found some other interesting sites on masonry stoves if anyone is interested, i dill try to be a little more carefuk with the bingers.
laters
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I WILL KEEP BANGING ON ABOUT MASONRY STOVES
lightfoot
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« Reply #50 on: March 08, 2009, 09:21:27 PM »

Evening daftlad,

You may of already seen them - but there's a number of masonry stove related links etc, in this old thread that may be of interest to yourself and others....

http://www.navitron.org.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3525.0.html


Lightfoot.


PS, it may just be my memory - but I was just reading back though the above 'Russian/Masonry High Thermal Heater Burning Wood' thread and I'm sure there were more posts/info links before - maybe they have been deleted or lost when the forum/server was upgraded etc  Huh

« Last Edit: March 09, 2009, 06:37:21 AM by lightfoot » Logged

Mother Nature is a wonderful housekeeper - but eat her out of house and home and you may just get your marching orders.
thebrick
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« Reply #51 on: January 05, 2010, 08:48:32 PM »

Hi folks
Well I've been away some time, but I'm back again since so have decided to buy 3 hectarces as a start. Poplar cherry and horsechestnut.
thanks
thebrick
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Ancient Brewer
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« Reply #52 on: January 07, 2010, 12:01:48 AM »

How about Birch?

If you have any heathland nearby often you will find the local conservation group clearing birch saplings. Years ago in Norfolk I got 30 Birch trees all about 5ft tall as a result of helping the local trust for the day. They were quite pleased they were going to be replanted - normally they just burned them.
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charlieb
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« Reply #53 on: January 07, 2010, 10:39:22 PM »

Good for you if you kept them all alive Brewer.   I find they're a pain to transplant - annoying, as they always seem to seed everywhere except where you want them, and I can't bring myself to pay money for birch seedlings.   I only seem to manage about 25% survival (though I do tend to be a bit rough when pulling/digging them up).
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AlanM
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« Reply #54 on: January 07, 2010, 11:09:54 PM »

Birch is often difficult to transplant. Usually the smaller the plant the better success you will have. Bigger trees much more difficult to establish than other species.

Alan
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