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Author Topic: bread baking temperature  (Read 19213 times)
Ivan
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« on: April 10, 2009, 01:38:25 AM »

I often make bread at home with a mechanical breadmaker (I know, lazy!). However, I do find we often get better results baking the mixed dough in the oven - particularly if I make rolls rather than bread. If I bake in the oven, I use 200C temperature

I'm planning to have a go at baking bread in a solar oven this year. Last year we did some experiments at Navitron using a crude oven made from Kingspan, and 4 or 5 Navitron solar tubes. Although the tube tips hit temperatures of over 160C, the heat transfer to the oven was too slow, so oven temperature didn't go higher than 145C. With a suitable hot plate connected to the tube tips at the base of the oven, and with a better seal on the oven 'door', I'm confident we can reack 160C and probably a bit higher.

The question is - what is the minimum temperature you can use to bake bread (ordinary bread)?
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Richard Owen
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« Reply #1 on: April 10, 2009, 09:55:12 AM »

I cook mine at 180c in the fan oven.

If you want to cook cooler, then go for open shaped loaves such as pan sous or bagels.

Don't expect a great crust.

First crack at diy hot cross buns today!
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sjaglin
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« Reply #2 on: April 10, 2009, 12:34:32 PM »

Hi,

I cook mine at 230C for 30-35 minutes, but I will test a brad baking in my solar cooker as soon as the weather permits a 140-150 (111 max so far this year).

A bout the Fan Oven, I have made a conventional solar cooker and wondered if a solar powered little fan would be any use to improve the cooking, any ideas?

Stef
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Paulh_Boats
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« Reply #3 on: April 10, 2009, 02:05:03 PM »

Our breadmaker bakes at 121C for an hour....with excellent results.
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Ivan
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« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2009, 11:40:51 PM »

In that case, I'll try a solar-powered bread. Won't be for a week or two - as the 'oven' is lying on one of the lawns in Oakham!
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sjaglin
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« Reply #5 on: April 22, 2009, 07:55:05 AM »

Hi,

Following your advises and some stuff on the net, I managed to make a loaf of bread and cook it yesterday (21st of April) in my solar cooker/oven.

The temperature was 120 celcius and the bread was well cooked in 2 hours at this temperature. It's important to raise the bread while the cooker heats up (an airing cupboard is perfect for that) to the desired temperature (at least 110) and then once the dough has doubled in size and the temperature is correct , quickly put it in the oven.

I used a thin black metal pan (oiled) with the top on (black as well).

I then extracted the loaf and displayed it tn the kitchen, on my way back from work my girlfriend had eaten half of it , thinkung it was a new fancy bread I bought from hobbs  Angry

Best wishes to all!

Stef

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daftlad
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« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2009, 06:06:24 PM »

Well done, do you have a pic of the bread (whats left) and a pic of the oven?
where is home?
laters
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sjaglin
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« Reply #7 on: April 22, 2009, 09:00:51 PM »

Yes, I have one on my website :

http://sjaglin.homelinux.org/Joomla/index.php/solar-cooker

Bottom of the page.

Home is in Chipping Sodbury, just by Bristol. Home is also in Nantes (France). And Madeira Island cause I like it!

Stef

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daftlad
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« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2009, 09:20:44 PM »

mmmmmmmm bread
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Richard Owen
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« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2009, 10:20:33 PM »

Yes, I have one on my website :

http://sjaglin.homelinux.org/Joomla/index.php/solar-cooker

Bottom of the page.


I recognise that Ikea beech worktop and those tiles look strangely familiar. I think you're keeping your energy costs down by cooking in my kitchen!
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Ivan
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« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2009, 01:18:56 AM »

Well done indeed! You beat me to it. If and when I get round to it, I think I'll make the dough, it can rise for two hours whilst I drive to Navitron HQ, and I'll bake it in the solar oven there, once I put it back together.
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sjaglin
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« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2009, 07:18:29 AM »

Quote
'll bake it in the solar oven there, once I put it back together.
And don't forget the water in your tube for the tea... Milk and sugar please and Biscuits (which will be my next project...)

Stef
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guydewdney
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« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2009, 08:36:09 AM »

My missus is a bit of a bread freak...

she says 120 to 140 would be ok for rolls, and would be easier.

Dont drive with the dough - you need to let it rise, then 'knock it back', let them rise a second time in the form you want. Ideally in a warm living room, not a cold room.
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« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2009, 10:49:42 PM »

Hm, maybe it's just me being German, but bread got to have a decent crumb and crust. While I'm sure the crumb can be baked at relatively low temps, for the crust you want it hot. Yes, HOT. Like 250 to 300C. A wood fired masonry oven (daftlad, it can be included in a masonry stove!) is the way to go.
Oh, and use sourdough instead of baker's yeast to leaven the dough.

If you can't get hold of the real thing ('cause I've been there first and eaten it all up Tongue ), a good introduction is The Bread Builders, by Daniel Wing and Alan Scott.

Enjoy!
Klaus
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Ivan
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« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2009, 11:59:27 PM »

Guy, what's the problem with driving? I planned to mix the dough in my breadmaker (lazy), which allows the dough to rise for an hour or so. Then I normally knock it back, form into rolls, and leave it for around 2hours to rise again. I'd planned to do this second stage in the car journey (car will be nice and warm), especially if it sits in the sun. Will the movement/vibration cause problems?
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