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Author Topic: heating innovations H2 link up  (Read 12179 times)
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« on: December 09, 2008, 10:05:17 PM »

we are looking to link up our fired rayburn to a wood burner with back boiler for wet ch and domestic hot water.

Hi All

read about dunsley hub.

recently came across heating innovations control panel H2 (can be googled) which provides a lot of options and most importantly looks to the woodburner for heat first and keeps oil burner in reserve as top up heat to the system.

anybody any experience or advice on this product or other?

would also be interested in achieving the same thing with manual controls if possible.

cheers

Bar
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Justme
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« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2008, 10:44:04 PM »

It would be dangerous with manual controls (but some have done so). You could close one valve & open the wrong one & create a bomb. The valves need to be inter locked so that operating one operates all those that need to be operated at the same time to keep it safe & also to fail safe if some thing goes wrong. You could make your own "H2" using valves & controllers & a programable controller. It also has temp monitors to help the system run properly. I think they also now have a H3 & a H4 is on the way.

Justme


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« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2008, 04:24:55 AM »

I have a friend who is installing one as part of his system, but don't yet have details on how well it works. It has been mentiopned before on this board: a search may yield useful info.
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Wookey
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« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2009, 08:33:48 AM »

Hello,

I fitted a solid fuel rayburn into my oil central heating system without any neautraliser or any changes to my existing (1960's) central heating system. I just simply teed 28mm gravity fed lines into the existing hot water tank and then plumbed the rayburn into the flow and return at the nearest radiator via a dedicated pump.
A used a pump with a variable speed setting, for some reason the house is warmest when the pump is operated on the lowest speed setting.

As long as your system is open vented then there are no major issues.
Obviously you have to be carefull to ensure that you dont build in any trapped volumes.
I have some some valves in my system that if closed would create trapped volumes, that could lead to explosions if any one was daft enough to close the valves when the rayburn was on.
I removed the exposion risk by installing a couple of 0.5 bar pressure releif valves within the potential trapped volume, thus removing the risk.

The one initial problem I had was that when the oil heating came on, sometimes water exiting Rayburn would be boiling. I got around this by lowering the thermostat on the oil boiler down to minimum.
 
It has been running great for a couple of years and reduced my oil use by 50% to 70%, although I have to keep the Rayburn stocked with wood throughout the winter.
I suspect that my savings would be greater if I had a proper installation utilising a neutraliser, however the upheaval involved in a proper installation was prohibitive.

The usual small print applies to my experiences!

James
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reggieroo
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« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2009, 07:45:58 PM »

I looked into using the H2 but everytime I mentioned it to any plumbers they just said "no we would use a neutraliser" never heard of it!
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Justme
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2009, 08:58:06 PM »

Dunsley neutraliser. Google it.
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Total bank 4350 amp/h 5C
Brandon
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2009, 09:08:29 PM »

esse centraliser, for a variation on the theme...
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« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2009, 11:29:07 AM »

Nice layout pics as well!

http://www.esse.com/pdfs/Centraliser.pdf

Esse unit 299 + Vat
Dunsley wall mount Unit 245.50 + Vat
H2 panel  500 + Vat
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