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Author Topic: Heat dump rad 15mm connection  (Read 3713 times)
Mister Sheen
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« on: September 19, 2009, 05:47:09 PM »

Hi

I've almost completed the heat dump loop for my WBS (a Dunsley Yorkshire 17KW model). I've connected about 5m of vertically-mounted (minimal horizontal) 28mm pipe up to and down from the loft. A normally-open (for the event of a power-out) motorised valve , controlled by a 80 deg C pipe stat on the back of the stove, in the loft allows the dumped hot water into a 8 sq ft double rad.

(I've tee-ed off about half-way up this pipe run to pump the water in and out of a Dunsley Baker neutraliser which links up my WBS and gas boiler)

My query is - despite the 28mm pipe, does reducing this to 15mm for entry in and out of the dump rad stall the thermosyphoning which I require

I could of course use a pump but they don't work without electricity!!!
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desperate
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« Reply #1 on: September 19, 2009, 10:13:19 PM »

Mr Sheen

I reckon you should be ok, with a 5 metre vertical pipe run you are going to generate a reasonable pressure to drive the flow through the rad, keep the 15 mm as short as possible

Desperate
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Ivan
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« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2009, 05:51:45 PM »

































It will be fine. Have you ever seen the size of the hole in the centre of a rad valve?! It's much smaller (10mm-ish).

I've got 22mm pipe from woodstove to upstairs rad, with the last 1m or so in 15mm on both pipes. The rad is 5000BTU, and gets too hot to touch when the woodstove is going well.










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KenB
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« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2009, 06:45:39 PM »

Hi Mr. Sheen,

All the literature I found suggested that the heatleak radiator should be plumbed with a minimum of 22mm pipe.  That's no problem - you just ditch the valves and go straight in with a suitable 22mm to half inch brass coupling.

I bought a 1000mm x 600mm double convector from B&Q's "Kudox" radiator range which is rated at 5856TU.  It was the only one that had threaded connections both at top and bottom on both sides - that I could find on a Sunday.

I bought a pair of 22mm compression to 1/2" BSP iron couplings and plumbed a short 22mm branch from the rising 28mm from the back of the boiler.

I know that my woodstove boiler is much lower output than yours, I think it's 5kW but that's probably only when burning coal with a following wind.

I got it up to 55C this afternoon - but I am still "running in" the woodstove.



Ken
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Mister Sheen
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2009, 10:43:17 PM »

Cheers guys!

Actually fired everything up yesterday and all the thermosyphoning works a treat. The rad could do with being a shade bigger but keeps the stove boiler below 90C for at least the duration of the burn of a full load of wood in the event of a power-out.

Only thing I've got to worry about now is my roof being lit-up on the infra-red camera of the local police helicopter and the following-mornings drugs raid on the grounds of running an illicit hydroponics drugs farm in my loft!!!

Thanks to all those who offered help and support in this, and other, threads.

Dead chuffed and currently drinking 18yo Islay malt!!

Sheen.
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Brandon
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2009, 08:25:06 AM »

well done.

out of interest, why the heat leak in the loft?

I have always seen heat leak rads as a useful source of heat, and tend to mount them in bathrooms, on landings etc...
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Mister Sheen
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2009, 07:59:28 PM »

.....small house, only bedrooms upstairs which we don't like to heat too much as the house is fairly well insulated and we can't sleep too well in the heat. Have toyed with the idea of a pre-heater hot water tank (in series with existing one), as a dump,  but would have to raise the header tanks, too much of a faff etc.

Don't envisage dumping too much heat - this is why there is the stat-controlled normally-open motorised valve controlling the rad instead of having a permanent open-flow. I'll probably run the heating (downstairs & bathroom mainly) until the fire is largely exhausted, having the dump rad as a safety back up.

....Or  perhaps having a skunk farm in the loft might indeed be a more efficient use of fuel after all :-)

Sh.
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sleepybubble
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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2009, 08:06:08 PM »

.....small house, only bedrooms upstairs which we don't like to heat too much as the house is fairly well insulated and we can't sleep too well in the heat. Have toyed with the idea of a pre-heater hot water tank (in series with existing one), as a dump,  but would have to raise the header tanks, too much of a faff etc.

Don't envisage dumping too much heat - this is why there is the stat-controlled normally-open motorised valve controlling the rad instead of having a permanent open-flow. I'll probably run the heating (downstairs & bathroom mainly) until the fire is largely exhausted, having the dump rad as a safety back up.

....Or  perhaps having a skunk farm in the loft might indeed be a more efficient use of fuel after all :-)

Sh.

you don't want to grow skunks they smell and would make even more noise than a squiril(sp?) in the loft...
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;-)
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