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Author Topic: Testing the site for turbine potential?  (Read 138 times)
Greenbeast
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« on: February 20, 2020, 03:47:13 PM »

We think we have a potentially good site for a turbine, we are on the crest of a hill, feels like fairly good consistent wind coming up the hill (mostly Southerly winds).
Looking at installing an anemometer to assess the site, any recommendations on those that aren't too expensive.

The field we're looking at is approx 120m across and is bordered by trees running north-south(ish) to the east (bordering with our other field) and west (bordering the road and woodland other side of the road), and then ancient woodland to the north.

Here is the google maps image of it, the faint line at the south is our boundary, which is a young hedge, no trees in that direct for a good distance (the other side of the valley infact)



What is the recommended distance from trees to avoid turbulence?

Any thoughts on planning permission? This is an AONB
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A.L.
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« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2020, 04:21:41 PM »

hello,

at least as here:-

http://www.greenspec.co.uk/building-design/small-wind-turbines/
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Ted
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« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2020, 04:32:38 PM »

An AONB is defined as article 2(3) land under the legislation so you will need planning permission.

The High Weald AONB (where you are) commissioned a wind turbine study back in May 2009; so it is very out-of-date and also conducted at quite a high level (i.e. pretty worthless) but the parts of it will give you a good idea of the sort of headings you would need to address in any planning application you might make.

https://www.highweald.org/420-home/research-reports/86-wind-energy-assessment-for-the-high-weald.html
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Greenbeast
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« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2020, 05:46:33 PM »

Thanks guys
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